Argosy University Programs

School Psychology EdS Degree Program

EdS, School Psychology

Program Information

The Education Specialist (EdS) degree in School Psychology state certification program at Argosy University, Phoenix is dedicated to producing ethical, responsible, and competent school psychologists who can serve effectively in a range of professional roles within the school settings. The program emphasizes the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills essential to the preparation of school psychologists who are committed to the ethical provision of quality services to diverse populations. Students develop core competencies in psychological and educational foundations; cognitive, academic, and personality assessment; psychoeducational interventions, statistics and research methodology, and research initiatives. This 36-credit-degree program, based on standards developed by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), is designed to prepare students who wish to pursue certification at the EdS level.

Note
The EdS in School Psychology state certification degree program is approved by the Arizona Department of Education to lead to school psychology licensure/certification upon completion of all program and state requirements. The programs offered through Argosy University Online Programs, with the exclusion of the MAED in Educational Administration, DO NOT lead to teacher or administrator certification, licensure, or endorsement in any State in the United States regardless of the State in which the student resides.

Program Learning Outcomes
2.1 Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability — Knowledge
• 2.1.1 School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes.

2.1 Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability – Skills
• 2.1A Candidates use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources as part of a comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery.
• 2.1B Candidates systematically collect data and other information about individuals, groups, and environments as key components of professional school psychology practice.
• 2.1C. Candidates translate assessment and data collection results into design, implementation, and accountability for evidence-based instruction, interventions, and educational and mental health services effective for particular situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics.
• 2.1D Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to evaluate response to, progress in, and outcomes for services in order to promote improvement and effectiveness.
• 2.1E Candidates access information and technology resources to enhance data collection and decision-making.
• 2.1F Candidates measure and document effectiveness of their own services for children, families, and schools.

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration — Knowledge
• 2.2.1 School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services.

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration — Skills
• 2.2A Candidates apply consultation methods, collaborate, and communicate effectively with others as part of a comprehensive process that permeates all aspects of service delivery.
• 2.2B Candidates consult and collaborate in planning, problem solving, and decision-making processes and to design, implement, and evaluate instruction, interventions, and educational and mental health services across particular situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics.
• 2.2C Candidates consult and collaborate at the individual, family, group, and systems levels.
• 2.2D Candidates facilitate collaboration and communication among diverse school personnel, families, community professionals, and others.
• 2.2E Candidates effectively communicate information for diverse audiences, for example, parents, teachers, other school personnel, policy makers, community leaders, and/or others.
• 2.2F Candidates promote application of psychological and educational principles to enhance collaboration and achieve effectiveness in provision of services.

2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills — Knowledge
• 2.3.1 School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence based curriculum and instructional strategies.

2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills — Skills
• 2.3A Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate academic goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs.
• 2.3B Candidates implement services to achieve academic outcomes, including classroom instructional support, literacy strategies, home–school collaboration, instructional consultation, and other evidence-based practices.
• 2.3C Candidates use evidence-based strategies to develop and implement services at the individual, group, and systems levels and to enhance classroom, school, home, and community factors related to children’s cognitive and academic skills.
• 2.3D Candidates implement methods to promote intervention acceptability and fidelity and appropriate data-based decision making procedures, monitor responses of children to instruction and intervention, and evaluate the effectiveness of service.

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills — Knowledge
• 2.4.1 School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health.

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills — Skills
• 2.4A Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate social-emotional, behavioral, and mental health goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs.
• 2.4B Candidates implement services to achieve outcomes related to socialization, learning, and mental health, including, for example, counseling, consultation, behavioral intervention, home-school collaboration, and other evidence-based practices.
• 2.4C Candidates integrate behavioral supports and mental health services with academic and learning goals for children.
• 2.4D Candidates use evidence-based strategies to develop and implement services at the individual, group, and/or systems levels and to enhance classroom, school, home, and community factors related to children’s mental health, socialization, and learning.
• 2.4E Candidates implement methods to promote intervention acceptability and fidelity and appropriate data-based decision making procedures, monitor responses of children to behavioral and mental health services, and evaluate the effectiveness of services.

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning – Knowledge
• 2.5.1 School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health.

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning — Skills
• 2.5A Candidates design and implement evidence-based practices and policies in, for example, areas such as discipline, instructional support, staff training, school improvement activities, program evaluation, student transitions at all levels of schooling, grading, home-school partnerships, etc.
• 2.5B Candidates utilize data-based decision making and evaluation methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, technology resources, and other services for systems-level issues, initiatives, and accountability responsibilities.
• 2.5C Candidates create and maintain effective and supportive learning environments for children and others within a multi-tiered continuum of school-based services.
• 2.5D Candidates develop school policies, regulations, services, and accountability systems to ensure effective services for all children.

2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services — Knowledge
• 2.6.1 School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response.

2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services — Skills
• 2.6A Candidates promote environments, contexts, and services for children that enhance learning, mental and physical well-being, and resilience through protective and adaptive factors and that prevent academic problems, bullying, violence, and other risks.
• 2.6B Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate goals for and to evaluate outcomes of prevention and response activities and crisis services.
• 2.6C Candidates contribute to, design, implement, and/or evaluate prevention programs that integrate home, school, and community resources and promote learning, mental health, school climate and safety, and physical well-being of all children and families.
• 2.6D Candidates contribute to, design, implement, and/or evaluate services for crisis prevention, preparation, response, and recovery at the individual, family, and systems levels and that take into account diverse needs and characteristics.
• 2.6 E Candidates utilize data-based decision making methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, collaboration, and direct and indirect services for preventive and responsive services to promote learning and mental health and for crisis services.

2.7 Family-School Collaboration Services — Knowledge
• 2.7.1 School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools.

2.7 Family-School Collaboration Services — Skills
• 2.7A Candidates design and implement evidence-based practices and policies that facilitate family-school partnerships and interactions with community agencies to enhance academic, learning, social, and mental health outcomes for all children.
• 2.7B Candidates identify diverse cultural issues, situations, contexts, and other factors that have an impact on family-school interactions and address these factors when developing and providing services for families.
• 2.7C Candidates utilize data-based decision making, evaluation methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, communication, and direct and indirect services to enhance family-school-community effectiveness in addressing the needs of children.
• 2.7D Candidates design, implement, and evaluate education programs and other types of services that assist parents with promoting the academic and social–behavioral success of their children and addressing issues and concerns.

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning — Knowledge
• 2.8.1 School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity.

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning – Skills
• 2.8A Candidates provide effective professional services in data-based decision-making, consultation and collaboration, and direct and indirect services for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding of and respect for diversity and in development and learning is a foundation for all aspects of service delivery.
• 2.8B Candidates, in collaboration with others, address individual differences, strengths, backgrounds, and needs in the design, implementation, and evaluation of services in order to improve academic, learning, social and mental health outcomes for all children across family, school, and community contexts.
• 2.8C Candidates, in schools and other agencies, advocate for social justice and recognition that cultural, experiential, linguistic, and other areas of diversity may result in different strengths and needs; promote respect for individual differences; recognize complex interactions between individuals with diverse characteristics; and implement effective methods for all children, families, and schools to succeed.
• 2.8D Candidates provide culturally competent and effective practices in all areas of school psychology service delivery and in the contexts of diverse individual, family, school, and community characteristics.

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation — Knowledge
• 2.9.1 School psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings.

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation — Skills
• 2.9A Candidates evaluate and synthesize a cumulative body of research and its findings as a foundation for effective service delivery.
• 2.9B Candidates provide assistance in schools and other settings for analyzing, interpreting, and applying empirical evidence as a foundation for effective practices at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.
• 2.9C Candidates incorporate various techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, analysis, and accountability in decision-making and in evaluation of services at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.
• 2.9D Candidates, in collaboration with others, design, conduct analyses, and/or interpret research and/or program evaluation in applied settings.

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice — Knowledge
• 2.10.1 School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists.

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice — Skills
• 2.10A Candidates provide services consistent with ethical and professional standards in school psychology.
• 2.10B Candidates provide services consistent with legal standards and regulations relevant for practice in settings in which school psychologists work.
• 2.10C Candidates engage in effective and responsive ethical and professional decision-making that reflects recognition of diverse needs and characteristics of children, families, schools, and other professionals.
• 2.10D Candidates apply professional work characteristics needed for effective practice as school psychologists, including respect for human diversity and social justice, communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, responsibility, adaptability, initiative, dependability, and technology skills.
• 2.10E Candidates utilize supervision and mentoring for effective school psychology practice.
• 2.10F Candidates engage in effective, collaborative professional relationships and interdisciplinary partnerships.
• 2.10G Candidates, in collaboration with other professionals (e.g., teachers, principals, library and media specialists), access, evaluate, and utilize information resources and technology in ways that enhance the quality of services for children.
• 2.10H Candidates advocate for school psychologists’ professional roles to provide effective services, ensure access to their services, and enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth.
• 2.10I Candidates engage in career-long self-evaluation and continuing professional development.

Apply
Enhance your career potential by enrolling in the Argosy University, Phoenix Education Specialist (EdS) in School Psychology degree program. You can learn more about specific financial aid programs (available to those who qualify) on our Financial Aid & Scholarships pages, or by contacting us to request more information.

This degree program is also offered at other Argosy University Locations

DISCLAIMER(S)

Only the MAED in Educational Administration, the EdS in Initial Educational Administration, the EdD in Initial Educational Administration, the EdS in Advanced Educational Administration, and the EdD in Advanced Educational Administration are approved by the Arizona Department of Education to lead to school administration licensure/certification upon completion of all program and state requirements.

Only the MA in School Psychology , EdS in School Psychology, and the PsyD in School Psychology are approved by the Arizona Department of Education to lead to school psychology licensure/certification upon completion of all program and state requirements.

The EdS in School Psychology is designed for those who want to become certified school psychologists in the P-12 setting. These programs meet the requirements for certification as a school psychologist and are approved by the Arizona Department of Education. Students are also eligible to apply to become Nationally Certified School Psychologists in a process designed for graduates of non-NASP approved programs.

The programs offered through Argosy University Online Programs DO NOT lead to teacher or administrator certification, licensure, or endorsement in any State in the United States regardless of the State in which the student resides.

All fields required

select
select
select
select

Step 1 of 2