Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg

Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg

Now accepting applications for Fall 2017

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Our Clinical Psychology programs are designed to prepare practitioner-scholars whose scientific, theoretical and practical foundations enable them to meet the challenges of the diverse settings, populations and communities in which they serve.

Personal and Professional Preparation

The Illinois School of Professional Psychology (ISPP) at Argosy University, Schaumburg is located just northwest of Chicago in the charming community of Schaumburg. In our Master of Arts (MA) and Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology programs, we’ve cultivated a collaborative academic environment, led by a faculty with nationally recognized scholars who encourage your development both as a person and as a professional.

Argosy University, Schaumburg

1000 N. Plaza Drive, Suite 324,
Schaumburg, Illinois 60173-4942
Phone: 847-969-4900

Clinical Admissions Director

Palak (Paula) Thakkar
pthakkar@argosy.edu
847-969-4903

Transcripts and Education Verifications

Tyler Shippen
tshippen@argosy.edu

Local Training Sites

In 2012, we established the Northwest Suburban Internship Consortium, which is exclusively for our students and holds membership status with the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC).

In addition, our approved training sites include:

  • State mental health facilities
  • Out-patient clinics
  • Private and community hospitals and psychiatric units
  • Chemical dependence treatment programs
  • University counseling centers
  • VA organizations
  • Schools
  • Women's shelters
  • Treatment centers for developmental, emotional or behavioral disorders; and specialized programs in neuropsychology, forensics, eating disorders, rehabilitation, and other areas.

Recent News

Works at Correctional Facility Completing Mental Health Screenings and Providing Therapy
Works at Correctional Facility Completing Mental Health Screenings and Providing Therapy

Molly Meier Hendrickson
2015, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg
Clinical Psychologist at Wexford Health Solutions

“Developing professional relationships with professors and developing a mentor relationship was very important for my career path. The classes, instructors, and support from the clinical training department allowed me to be well prepared to work successfully as a clinician in a range of settings.”

Works at Correctional Facility Completing Mental Health Screenings and Providing Therapy

Dr. Molly Meier Hendrickson is a clinical psychologist within the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC). While she was uncertain at first that she’d pursue corrections as a career path, Hendrickson discovered that it offered diversity in assessing and treating an array of disorders and clinical presentations. “I currently work at Stateville Correctional Facility, a maximum security adult male prison, where I complete mental health screenings, mental health evaluations, provide individual therapy and provide crisis intervention,” she stated. Hendrickson will help to rebuild IDOC’s pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship programs.

She’s also a contract psychologist one day a week for the Northwestern Medicine Transitional Care Clinic, assessing and treating patients with extensive histories of trauma. “I am at the clinic each Friday, serving as an integrated part of the medical team that treats patients who come through Northwestern Medicine's emergency department and are uninsured or poorly insured,” Hendrickson said.

Hendrickson chose to attend the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg because of the faculty’s strong reputation in clinical and research work. “I appreciated being able to develop professional, and ultimately collegial, relationships with professors and my mentor, Dr. Kammie Juzwin,” she said. “Developing relationships with the professors allowed me to gain experiences, such as my research lab, that were outside of my practicum training. While the research lab was not part of the required curriculum, I gained invaluable experience that ultimately lead to me presenting at four international conferences and winning an international award.”

During her graduate training, Hendrickson focused on diversifying her clinical training experience. “My first practicum site focused on providing comprehensive psychological testing for adults, adolescents, and children and I provided evaluations for parents trying to obtain custody or visitation rights with their children” she said. “I then moved on to a therapy practicum at Dixon Correctional Center, a medium security adult male prison, where I conducted approximately six different group therapies, provided individual therapy and completed initial mental health intakes on offenders.” Her third practicum was at the Racine Youthful Offender Correctional Facility, a medium security prison for young males. “I [also] conducted pre-employment psychological evaluations for law enforcement, fire, correctional and dispatch candidates.”

To expand her experience beyond corrections, Hendrickson chose a pre-doctoral internship at the Huntington Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center in West Virginia. “I gained experience in providing comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations on a poly-trauma team, and was also part of the trauma recovery program (PTSD treatment), substance use disorder team, home-based primary care team (geriatrics and veterans unable to leave their home) and psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery center (serious mental illness),” she added. Hendrickson completed her post-doctoral fellowship at Primary Care Psychology Associates in Chicago. “I was primarily located at Northwestern Medical Clinics in downtown Chicago, and provided individual therapy, exam room consultations, consultations to the physicians and comprehensive psychological evaluations.”

Her first job was with Primary Care Psychology Associates. “[As a staff psychologist], I led weekly seminars for their interns and practicum students,” she said. Her career highs include presenting at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference in 2015 on the topic of identifying differences between law enforcement candidates with and without military experience. “I was able to present this data at the same conference that President Barack Obama attended and spoke at,” she stated. “Researchers in the police psychology field who viewed my presentation in 2015 nominated me for the Early Career Police Psychologist Award and Scholarship, which I won and received at the following conference in 2016.” Hendrickson was asked to participate in Experience in Care & Health Outcomes (ECHO) Behavioral Health Training Series, which was developed by University of Chicago to educate physicians and medical staff in Chicago and the suburbs on how to meet the behavioral health needs of their patients.”

Hendrickson recommended that current students diversify their training, be open to traveling to far away training sites, customize every cover letter, and don’t be afraid to apply to sites that they think they may not be accepted to. “I didn't have any Veterans’ Affairs experience prior to my internship, but was able to get an American Psychological Association-accredited VA training site for internship,” she added. “I attribute this to the time I spent tailoring each cover letter to the specific site, explaining why I was a good fit and why I had experience that matched their training program goals. This was confirmed for me by my training staff once I began internship when they told me my specific cover letter and interview is what had them rank me highly despite my lack of VA experience.”

Hendrickson is actively involved in the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Society for Police and Criminal Psychology and American Psychology-Law Society. “I have been involved in Booster Club volunteering for Roosevelt High School's football team and Wendell Phillips Academy High School's football team, both located in underprivileged neighborhoods within Chicago where some of the players are homeless or live in shelters,” she said.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Schaumburg, 1000 North Plaza Drive, Suite 324, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4942. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/797 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Oversees Staff Who Conduct Services in Outpatient Mental Health; Collaborated to Write Air Force Guide for Suicide Risk Assessment, Management and Treatment
Oversees Staff Who Conduct Services in Outpatient Mental Health; Collaborated to Write Air Force Guide for Suicide Risk Assessment, Management and Treatment

Major Matthew Nielsen
2008, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg
Director of Mental Health Services for the United States Air Force

“I have fond memories of my professors at Argosy University. They are each different in their teaching style, personalities and passions but I always felt that they were experts in their fields.”

Oversees Staff Who Conduct Services in Outpatient Mental Health; Collaborated to Write Air Force Guide for Suicide Risk Assessment, Management and Treatment

Dr. Matthew Nielsen is the director of mental health services for the United States Air Force at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. He oversees 56 staff members who conduct services in outpatient mental health, primary care behavioral health, domestic maltreatment and alcohol/drug abuse. “We currently treat [only] active duty service members and we have over 11,000 patient encounters per year,” he said. Nielsen is a major in the United States Air Force and has served for 10 years.

Nielsen completed a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg in 2008. He chose to pursue an undergraduate psychology degree because he enjoyed talking with people. “I tried a few business ventures before my wife encouraged me to re-look at pursuing my graduate degree in psychology,” he said. “After conducting interviews at different schools, Argosy University felt like the right fit for the knowledge and experiences I wanted to obtain. The professors there also seemed fantastic. It ended up being the perfect choice.”

“I joined the United States Air Force for my internship in to get training in health psychology, neuropsychology and adult outpatient mental health services,” said Nielsen. “[My intention was to] serve the four-year commitment, then start a private practice. I’ve now been serving on active duty status for almost ten years and can't imagine doing anything else.” Nielsen added prior to his internship, he didn’t realize that the military employed psychologists.

Nielsen’s military career provided growth opportunities that allowed him to balance his desire to have both clinical and administrative/leadership responsibilities. “I also find deep satisfaction in serving the heroes who sacrifice so much for this country,” he added.

In 2010, Nielsen deployed to Iraq for a six-month tour where he treated soldiers on the front lines. He returned and worked in an administrative position at Air Force medical headquarters. “I was the Air Force lead in collaborating with the nation's and even world's top suicidologists in writing the Air Force Guide for Suicide Risk Assessment, Management and Treatment,” he said. “This guide has become a national benchmark for many civilian organizations. I was also responsible for the mental health business operations for 2,000 mental health personnel and two million beneficiaries.”

Nielsen has eight published or pending-published manuscripts related to primary care behavioral health (PCBH) services in core competency skills training, provider attrition, patient satisfaction, primary care team member perceptions, marital interventions, providing PCBH services in a deployed environment, utilizing mental health technicians and utilizing PCBH as the access point for mental health related care.

He contributed to a chapter on military suicide and prevention and recently completed a one-year pilot study at three locations where patients were seen in PCBH before being seen directly in specialty mental health outpatient clinics. “This led better access to care, decreased mental health stigma and a decrease in out of network costs among other benefits,” he said.

Additionally, Nielsen is working with medical leaders to create PCBH policy as the mental health access point and to implement the plan across the Air Force. He’s proud to have been named the Air Force Company Grade Officer of the quarter in 2013 and the Society of Air Force Psychologists, Field Grade Officer of the Year in 2016. He earned the Air Force Surgeon General Research award in 2016.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Schaumburg, 1000 North Plaza Drive, Suite 324, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4942. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/797 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Read more...
Eme publishes “A Review Neurobehavioral Outcomes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Mini Review”
Eme publishes “A Review Neurobehavioral Outcomes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Mini Review”

Robert Eme, PhD, professor of clinical psychology at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Schaumburg recently published an article titled “A Review Neurobehavioral Outcomes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Mini Review.” The review appears in in Brain Sciences - Open Access Neuroscience Journal.

The article appears on http://www.mdpi.com/journal/brainsci.

The article focuses on traumatic brain injury outcomes and their classification as acute or chronic. Acute outcomes refer to injuries that occur immediately at the time of the injury and subsequent short-term consequences. Chronic outcomes refer to adverse outcomes that are more long-term. In mild traumatic brain injury, recovery from acute outcomes typically occurs very rapidly, i.e., within 2 weeks, with full recovery expected by 90 days. However, some 10%–15% individuals can remain symptomatic for much longer with an outcome termed post-concussive syndrome. This outcome is difficult to predict since there are very few rigorous, prospective studies of this syndrome.

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Dr. Robert Eme Publishes Article Titled “A Review of the Most Recent Longitudinal Studies of ADHD”
Dr. Robert Eme Publishes Article Titled “A Review of the Most Recent Longitudinal Studies of ADHD”

Robert Eme, PhD, professor of clinical psychology at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Schaumburg recently published an article entitled “A Review of the Most Recent Longitudinal Studies of ADHD (Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder).The article appears in the Journal of Memory Disorders and Rehabilitation published on March 21, 2017.

The article reviews the findings from the six most recent longitudinal studies of ADHD and examines what the future likely holds for an individual with childhood ADHD.

The article shows that approximately two-thirds of children with childhood ADHD will continue to be moderately or severely impaired in young adulthood. The two most robust predictors of this outcome are severity of ADHD and co morbid conduct problems.

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