Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

Hawaii School of Professional Psychology

The 2018 Spring and Fall Application Cycle Opens September 13th, 2017.

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Our Clinical Psychology programs are designed to prepare practitioner-scholars whose scientific, theoretical and practical foundations enable them to meet the challenges of the diverse settings, populations and communities in which they serve.

Personal and Professional Preparation

Offering a Master of Arts and a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology, The Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University (HSPP) is dedicated to encouraging your personal and professional growth through faculty mentorship, engaging classroom discussions and experiential learning opportunities. Our programs are vitally important for developing psychologists who can work to address the mental health needs of local populations in Hawai'i, and who understand and recognize the importance of social justice and human diversity.

Argosy University, Hawaii

1001 Bishop Street, Suite 400,
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Phone: 808-536-5555

Admissions Representative

Kim R. K. Scott, MBA
krscott@argosy.edu
808-791-5247

Education Verifications or Alumni Transcript Requests

Kristen Connors
kconnors@argosy.edu
808-791-5228

Local Training Sites

At HSPP, we are committed to providing quality, practical training experiences for our students. Training sites may include:

  • Military Institutions
  • Private Practices
  • College Counseling Centers
  • Clinics
  • State and Federal Agencies
  • Medical Facilities
  • Rural Health Centers
  • Mental Health Hospitals

Recent News

Helps Student Veterans via Psychotherapy Crisis Intervention, Outreach and Training
Helps Student Veterans via Psychotherapy Crisis Intervention, Outreach and Training

Dr. Sarah Skelton
2014, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Psychologist, Practicum Training Coordinator and Student Veteran Liaison at Texas A&M University

“Argosy University’s focus on cultural competence, self-care and being student centered really made for a positive learning environment for me.”

Helps Student Veterans via Psychotherapy Crisis Intervention, Outreach and Training

Dr. Sarah Skelton is a psychologist, practicum training coordinator and student veteran liaison at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi, Texas. In her role with student veterans, Skelton provides short term psychotherapy, crisis intervention, outreach and training. It’s a profession that she pursued following the 9/11 attacks when she joined the Army as a mental health technician.

“I wanted to serve soldiers that were struggling with years of trauma and war,” she said. “When I came to Argosy University, I did not initially want to work with veterans and military in my practicum because I was already doing it in the Army. However, it was my [calling] to be able to work with soldiers and their families in different capacities.”

Skelton chose Argosy University because, according to her, it was a small, diverse school known for being military inclusive. “I was blessed to be in a military inclusive school and frequently had two to three veterans even in our small classes,” she states. “Hawaii is such a melting pot of diversity. The school’s focus on cultural competence, self-care and being student centered really made for a positive learning environment for me.” Her instructors, said Skelton, were interested in her success and she continues to keep in touch with both her instructors and mentors.

Skelton added that the school taught her how to be reflective and authentic—two qualities she describes as valuable assets in her profession. “I was a first generation student,” she continued. “When I started at Argosy University, I was the first in my family to go to college. By the time I finished, my mother and both of my sisters had graduated or were enrolled in college. Argosy looked at my experiences and life when considering my application and that helped me to change an entire generation of education in my family.”

During her practicum, Skelton worked at an active duty base in Hawaii at a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinic.  “When I was applying for my internship, I kept looking at training manuals of college counseling,” Skelton said. “It felt so much like what we do with our National Guard soldiers, just in a different context. I took a chance and applied for university counseling sites and was ultimately matched with Stanford University.”

At Stanford, Skelton developed training programs and initiatives for student veterans. Her post doctorate work took place at George Washington University, where she worked as a student veteran coordinator. “I love working with student veterans and military. I continue to serve as an enlisted mental health technician with the Texas National Guard and recently came back from a deployment where we were able to support the behavioral health needs of almost 2,500 soldiers in Iraq and Kuwait,” she said.

During that deployment, Skelton offered combat stress support to soldiers in Operation Spartan Shield in Kuwait and Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq. She also provided crisis management and trauma debriefings. “I taught 10 applied suicide intervention trainings and instructed 248 soldiers in suicide intervention skills,” she stated. “I was part of a resiliency team that coordinated a large scale suicide prevention outreach for over 500 service members and live streamed from Kuwait to Washington D.C. in collaboration with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.” Additionally, Skelton trained almost 500 soldiers in sexual harassment and assault prevention.

Her close relationships with military personnel are the highlight of her career, and she indicated that she works to eliminate the stigma of mental health in the military. “It’s a warrior culture,” she said. “So when I am offered a glimpse into their worlds, when they allow themselves to be vulnerable with me or when we build those relationships that allow for authentic dialogue and change, I feel my most successful.”

Skelton admits that transitioning into higher education after military life was difficult. “One of the biggest challenges I had was communication style,” she stated. “I was in the military and came from New York. You couldn’t find a more loud, intimidating direct communication style than I had [when I arrived in Hawaii]. Direct feedback from my peers and the ability to find an authentic way to communicate really helped people to hear what I was saying.”

Skelton served in the Army National Guard for 12 years and was named the Citizen Soldier of the Year (2008), Distinguished Honor Graduate for the Warrior Leader Course (WLC) (2011) and Trooper of the Quarter (2015). She was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal , Army Accommodation Medals, Army Achievement Medals and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Hawai`i, 1001 Bishop St #400, Honolulu, HI 96813. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/627 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Leads Organization that Provides Comprehensive Support Services to Homeless Veterans
Leads Organization that Provides Comprehensive Support Services to Homeless Veterans

Kimberley Cook
2008, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Executive Director at U.S. VETS - Barber's Point

“[The school’s] offering of a Doctor of Psychology track [instead of] a Doctor of Philosophy track spoke volumes to me, as I am not a researcher by heart. I wanted to learn the art of psychotherapy and healing people from within.”

Leads Organization that Provides Comprehensive Support Services to Homeless Veterans

Dr. Kimberley Cook is the executive director for U.S. VETS – Barber’s Point, an organization that provides comprehensive supportive services to veterans who are homeless and in need of assistance. She operates nearly 20 different programs and oversees 50 employees. “[Our organization is] the only veteran-specific program in the State of Hawai'i to not only directly serve our veterans, but interface with community members who support our veterans.

Cook is excited to work in the nonprofit field. “I have worked for many years with children with autism, in the field of chemical dependency, and with adults with severe mental illnesses. In 2009, I was given the opportunity to become a U.S. VETS clinical director and was given the responsibility of ensuring sound clinical practice for homeless and at-risk veterans reintegrating back in to society. In 2012, I transitioned to the executive director role,” she said.

Cook gains inspiration from the success of veterans within her program. “On any given night, we provide support services to nearly 800 veteran households in the community. Annually, we transition nearly 80% from homelessness to permanent sustainable housing, assist nearly 90% in maintaining their sobriety, and place approximately 100 veterans back in to competitive employment,” she said.

She considers her job to be a privilege and she’s proud to be part of an organization that’s doing important work within the community. “This year,” said Cook, “I humbly accepted one of our organization's highest honors, the ‘Executive Director of the Year’ award. I was also honored in 2016 as a VIP Woman of the Year Circle Honoree for the National Association of Professional Women.” In addition to her work as an executive director, Dr. Cook is a member of the West Oahu Professional Network (WOPN); the Argosy University, Hawai'i Advisory Board; and actively supports the March of Dimes and Make a Wish Foundations.

Cook chose to attend the Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University because of her passion to become a doctor and work in a healing profession. “The pursuit of my Doctor of Psychology degree in Clinical Psychology was in perfect alignment with my childhood dream and my passion to serve. [The school’s] offering of a Doctor of Psychology track [instead of] a Doctor of Philosophy track spoke volumes to me, as I am not a researcher by heart. I wanted to learn the art of psychotherapy and healing people from within. [The school] met all of my academic and personal expectations.”

She adds that the rigorous academic program prepared her well for the standards expected in the real world. “The challenging timelines, amount of work, and support you receive along the way really mimicked for me what real world is like. It is chaotic and hard work is necessary to be successful. I absolutely loved the challenge and because of the challenge, I was well prepared for [my future],” said Cook.

Cook earned her Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology from the Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University in 2008. She describes the program as challenging and asserts the importance of maintaining a healthy work-life-education balance. She said, “the one thing that sticks out for me during my [school] experience was the peer and faculty support. This made a huge impact on my life and career because it taught me that no matter how difficult a situation is, with the proper support and people who understand the struggle, [you can] achieve success. This factor has made me a better supervisor for my staff, a better leader for our veterans, and a better colleague for my peers.”

She recommends that current students put in the hard work now—to see benefits in the future. “Trust in the program that Argosy University, Hawai'i has designed for you,” she advises. “It truly aligns with the community standard for your chosen discipline.”

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Hawai`i, 1001 Bishop St #400, Honolulu, HI 96813. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See http://ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/627 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Read more...
Hawaii Grad Dr. Kimberley Cook Named a “Hawaii MVP”
Hawaii Grad Dr. Kimberley Cook Named a “Hawaii MVP”

Dr. Kimberley Cook, who in 2008 earned a Doctorate of Psychology in Clinical Psychology from Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, was recently named a “Hawaii MVP” by KITV News.

Cook was featured in a 4-minute news segment on the June 2, 2017 broadcast, highlighting her work as the executive director of U.S. VETS – Barber’s Point, an organization that provides comprehensive supportive services to veterans who are homeless and in need of assistance. She operates nearly 20 different programs and oversees 50 employees. “[Our organization is] the only veteran-specific program in the State of Hawai'i to not only directly serve our veterans, but interface with community members who support our veterans,” Cook said.

Video link:
http://www.kitv.com/story/35580252/hawaii-mvp-kim-cook

See http://ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/627 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Read more...
Hawai`i School Holds Clinical Training Seminar, “Evidence-Based Treatment Parent-Child Interaction Therapy”
Hawai`i School Holds Clinical Training Seminar, “Evidence-Based Treatment Parent-Child Interaction Therapy”

Recently, the Hawai`i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University hosted a clinical training seminar titled “Evidence-Based Treatment Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.” Dr. Steven Choy, associate professor, was the presenter.

The clinical seminar explored two evidence-based psychological treatments that have demonstrated success in improving parent-child relationship and reducing harmful parent-child interactions.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) uses behavioral and systems treatment modalities that work with both the parent and the child with in therapy room with treatment being provided by a trained therapist remotely through an earpiece for the parent. The therapy works on increasing the parent’s attunement to their child’s needs and focuses on helping the child increase positive social interactions and decrease negative destructive and non-compliant acting out behaviors.

Child Parent Psychotherapy is one of only a very few evidence-based relationship treatments that works with parents and infants or very young children together. The treatment uses psychodynamic and relationship treatment modalities to work through their past traumas and develop positive relationships. The therapy engages both the child and the parent in representational play therapy with the therapist in the room to guide the play and assist the parent in understanding the causes of their perception, behaviors and emotions and develop alternative healthy interactions with their child. The treatment focus is to work through the trauma so that it does not interfere with the healthy relationship between parent and child.

Choy is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the prevention, assessment and treatment of child maltreatment. With over 40 years in the field, he has a sub-specialty in developmental disabilities. In addition to his teaching, Choy is also the Director of the Family Strengthening Center (FSC) at Family Programs Hawaii. The FSC is an Argosy University-affiliated training center that provides multidisciplinary assessment, treatment and consultations services to the Department of Human Services-Child Welfare Services and Specialty Courts of the Oahu Family Court.

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