Master of Arts Curriculum

Our MA program bases professional training on the science of psychology by integrating research into our curriculum and through the teaching of evidence-based practices. In particular, we strive to help you develop the desire and skills necessary to address local problems with the clinical skills and research evidence found in the science of psychology. Full-time MA students normally begin a master's practicum and seminar during their second year.

Classroom experiences allow you to develop a strong knowledge base of theory and research. Through practicum work, you then have the opportunity to apply your theoretical knowledge, implement clinical techniques based on this knowledge, and develop the professional and personal attitudes important to the identity of the professional psychologist.

Course Listing

The MA in Clinical Psychology degree program requires the satisfactory completion of 50 semester credit hours distributed as follows: clinical knowledge requirements, 6 credit hours; professional issues and roles requirements, 5 credit hours; psychological assessment requirements, 6 credit hours; psychological intervention requirements, 12 credit hours; psychology foundation requirements, 9 credit hours; science and scholarship requirements, 6 credit hours; and clinical practicum requirements, 6 credit hours.

PsyD Course Schedule – Hawaii

Clinical Knowledge Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7045 - Psychopathology (3)
  • PP 7342 - Evaluation and Treatment of Diverse and Marginalized Populations (3)

Clinical Knowledge Requirements —6 Credit Hours

Professional Issues and Roles Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7100 - Professional Issues: Ethics, Conduct, and Law (3)
  • PP 7110 - Professionalization Group I (1)
  • PP 7111 - Professionalization Group II (1)

Professional Issues and Roles Requirements —5 Credit Hours

Psychological Assessment Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7370 - Cognitive Assessment (3)
  • PP 7371 - Objective Personality Assessment (3)

Psychological Assessment Requirements —6 Credit Hours

Psychological Intervention Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7365 - Clinical Interviewing (3)

Students Choose Three of the Following

  • PP 8010 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8020 - Person-Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8030 - Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8060 - Group Psychotherapy (3)

Psychological Intervention Requirements —12 Credit Hours

Psychology Foundation Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7010 - Lifespan Development (3)
  • PP 7040 - Cognition and Affective Processes (3)
  • PP 7051 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3)

Psychology Foundation Requirements —9 Credit Hours

Science and Scholarship Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 6011 - Integrative Paper (2)
  • PP 7041 - Quantitative Inquiry (3)
  • PP 7042 - Statistics Laboratory (1)

Science and Scholarship Requirements —6 Credit Hours

Clinical Practicum Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 6204 - Master’s Intervention Practicum and Seminar I (3)
  • PP 6205 - Master’s Intervention Practicum and Seminar II (3)
  • PP 6206 - Master’s Intervention Practicum and Seminar II—Extended (0)

Clinical Practicum Requirements —6 Semester Credit Hours

Graduation Requirements

Students who are admitted into the MA in Clinical Psychology degree program will be responsible for completing the program requirements that are in effect at the time of their admission. The school retains the right to modify these requirements in accordance with the demands of the profession of psychology. The courses will be completed in the order recommended by the Hawai‘i School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University.

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet the following requirements:

  • 50 semester credit hours that must be completed by the end of the fifth year of matriculation. The total credit hours must include:
    • 42 credit hours of required courses completed with a grade of “B-” or better.
    • 2 credit hours of Master’s Project.
    • 6 credit hours (one academic year) of Intervention Practicum and Seminar.
  • Satisfactory completion of Master’s Project.
  • A grade point average of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0.
  • Successful completion of the first year and Master’s Intervention Clinical Evaluation Conference (CEC).
  • Completed Petition to Graduate submitted to campus administration.

Students enrolled in the master’s degree program are required to complete all graduation requirements within five years of the date of matriculation.

Research Training

Consistent with our practitioner-scholar model and goals, this program can help you learn the knowledge and skills needed to critically evaluate professional literature, use this literature to inform your professional practice, and engage in research that aligns with your career objectives. Across the curriculum, your studies will be informed by current empirical research, and you will be taught to critically evaluate the literature and assess outcomes in a manner consistent with the model of the local clinical scientist. Formal training in research methods and statistical analysis occurs in two required semester-long courses, and, with this knowledge and experience, you may then begin work on your Clinical Research Project (CRP).

The Clinical Research Project (CRP)

The CRP is designed to develop and refine the skills necessary to integrate your clinical knowledge with research literature to produce original, scholarly research in clinical psychology. During this project, you will be expected to:

  • Significantly deepen your knowledge about a particular area (or areas) of clinical psychology
  • Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills
  • Develop and apply skills in research methodology

The CRP requires you to analyze and synthesize the psychological literature and to develop original research questions. To successfully complete this project, you must investigate these questions and draw conclusions based on your study results. CRPs may involve original empirical research using quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methodologies, or a comprehensive literature review with an original contribution, such as a proposal for program development, evaluation, or a novel treatment approach.

The Clinical Research Project can serve as a launching point for students and alumni to pursue further scholarship such as publications and presentations, often in collaboration with program faculty. Recent examples of such collaboration include publications in various journals such as the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, the New School Psychology Bulletin, and the Journal of Interdiscplinary Studies, as well as presentations at various conferences including the American Psychological Association, the Society of Personality Assessment, and the American Psychiatric Association.

  • Anderson, R. M., & Melnic, Y. K. (2013). Cybernetics, genetic engineering, and the future of psychotherapy. Journal of Interdiscplinary Studies, 25, 1/2, 39-53.
  • Valenti, M., Omizo, M., & Mehl-Madrona, L. (2011). Personality and obese body mass index. The New School Psychology Bulletin, 9(1), 56-60.
  • Valenti, M. P., Omizo, M. M., & Arellano, A. (2013, March). Personality variables and obesity. Paper presented at the annual Society of Personality Assessment Conference, San Diego, CA. Arellano, A., & Omizo, M.M. (2013, October). Gila in peril: The neurotoxic effects of anti-psychotic medication on the brain. Paper presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Keaney, M., Imada, K., Cisneros, J., Ignacio, L., & Omizo, M. (2014, October). Emotional attachment and relationship satisfaction among gay men. Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Cisneros, J, Keaney, M., Imada, Ignacio, L, & Omizo, M. (2014, October). Intravenous drug users: A qualitative study. Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Gullu-McPhee, S, Ignacio, L, Omizo, M., Imada, K., Keaney, M., & Cisneros, J. (2014 October). Emotional attachment and relationship satisfaction among lesbians and gay men. Paper presented at the annual American Psychiatric Association Institute, San Francisco, CA.
  • Hansia, Y. S., Awana, Y., & Lowe, S. (2013, August). South Asian Americans and the process of arranged marriage. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Awana, Y. N., & Pacheco III, E. (2012, October). Spirituality: It’s what you make it! Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Awana, Y. N., Davis, F., Johnson, S., Pacheco III, E., & Park, C. L. (2010, October). Transpersonal vision: Celebrating the love within. Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Lelie, N. Y., Lelie, A. J., Anderson Jr., R. M. (2014, October). Current assessment and treatment of sport concussions: A summary of the literature. Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Hamada, J. N., & Anderson Jr., R. M. (2014, October). The phenomenological self, working memory, and the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia: A theoretical integration. Paper presented at the Hawaii Psychological Association Convention, Honolulu, HI.