Doctor Of Psychology Curriculum

Based on the competencies developed by the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology, our PsyD curriculum provides students with a broad array of theoretical perspectives, in preparation for the general practice of clinical psychology. Required courses expose students to assessment and intervention strategies based on psychodynamic, cognitive, and systemic approaches.

The PsyD of Clinical Psychology degree program is a five-year program. Three full-time academic years (or the equivalent thereof) are dedicated to graduate coursework, including two years of practicum training during the second and the third academic years. The fourth academic year allows students to complete advanced elective courses, engage in an Advanced Practicum (if desired), and complete the Clinical Research Project (CRP). The fifth academic year is devoted to an internship in clinical psychology.

Course Listing

The PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program requires the satisfactory completion of 98 semester credit hours, distributed as follows: assessment requirements, 18 credit hours; clinical interventions/psychotherapy requirements, 15 credit hours; diversity requirement, 3 credit hours; elective requirements, 9 credit hours; ethics and professional conduct requirements, 5 credit hours; human development requirement, 3 credit hours; psychological foundations requirements, 12 credit hours; psychopathology requirements, 6 credit hours; scientific inquiry requirements, 6 credit hours; supervision/ consultation requirements, 3 credit hours; practicum and practicum seminar requirements, 14 credit hours; and clinical research project requirements, 4 credit hours.

Matriculated students must complete all course requirements in an in-residence format. In addition, all required coursework must be completed with a final grade of “B-” or better.

Full Course Sequence

Assessment Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7365 - Clinical Interviewing (3)
  • PP 7370 - Cognitive Assessment (4)
  • PP 7371 - Objective Personality Assessment (3)
  • PP 7372 - Projective Personality Assessment (4)
  • PP 7373 - Integrative Assessment (3)

Assessment Requirements—17 Credit Hours

Bases Course Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7000 - History and Systems (3)
  • PP 7040 - Cognition and Affective Processes (3)
  • PP 7050 - Physiological Psychology (3)
  • PP 7060 - Social Psychology (3)

Bases Course Requirement—12 Credit Hours

Individual Differences Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7010 - Lifespan Development (3)
  • PP 7330 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3)
  • PP 7501 - Adult Psychopathology (3)

Individual Differences Requirement—9 Credit Hours

Interventions Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7340 - Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations (3)
  • PP 7360 - Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)
  • PP 7350 - Consultation and Supervision (3)
  • PP 8010 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8030 - Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8041 - Integrative Approaches to Therapy (3)
  • PP 8050 - Family and Couples Therapy (3)

Interventions Requirements—21 Credit Hours

Methodology Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7200 - Statistics and Research I (3)
  • PP 7201 - Statistics and Research II (3)

Methodology Requirement—6 Credit Hours

Professional Issues Requirement*

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 7100 - Professional Issues: Ethics, Conduct, and Law (3)
  • PP 7110 - Professionalization Group I (1)
  • PP 7111 - Professionalization Group II (1)

Professionalization Group Requirements—5 Credit Hours

Practicum Requirement

Students Are Required to Take the Following

  • PP 8201 - Practicum I (3)
  • PP 8202 - Practicum II (3)
  • PP 8203 - Practicum III (3)
  • PP 8204 - Practicum IV (3)

Practicum Requirements—12 Credit Hours

Clinical Research Project Requirements

Students Are Required to Take the Following:

  • PP 8502 - Clinical Research Project II (1)

Clinical Research Project Requirements—4 Credit Hours

Elective Requirements

Students may wish to take elective courses in an area of concentration. Only the elective courses required for a concentration will be offered yearly. Annual electives vary from year to year. Some examples of electives are included in the table below. Students choose four:

  • PP 8011 - Advanced Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy (3)
  • PP 8034 - Advanced Experiential Psychotherapy and Supervision (3)
  • PP 8060 - Group Psychotherapy (3)
  • PP 8102 - Advanced Family and Couples Therapy (3)
  • PP 8160 - Introduction to Clinical Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Clients
  • PP 8175 - Child and Adolescent Therapy (3)
  • PP 8185 - Social Psychology and Difference (3)
  • PP 8620 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3)
  • PP 8450 - Advance Child & Adolescent Neuropsychology (3)
  • PP 8605 - Issues in Pediatric Psychology (3)
  • PP 8627 - Assessment of Forensic Populations (3)
  • PP 8645 - Introduction to Neuropsychology (3)
  • PP 8648 - Neuropsychological Assessment (3)
  • PP 8650 - Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders (3)
  • PP 8665 - Medical Psychology (3)
  • PP 8711 - Treatment of Traumatized Children (3)
  • PP 8715 - Geropsychology (3)
  • PP 8717 - Psychology of Gender (3)
  • PP 8950 - Special Topics (3)

Elective Requirements—12 Credit Hours

*Indicates core courses

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet the following requirements:

  • 98 semester credit hours, of which 88 credit hours must be completed by the end of the fifth year of matriculation. The total credit hours must include:
    • 70 credit hours of required core courses*
    • 12 credit hours (two years) of practicum and practicum seminar groups
    • A minimum of 12 credit hours of electives
    • 4 credit hours of Clinical Research Project
  • Successful completion of all sections of the Clinical Presentation Evaluation (CPE)
  • Successful completion of the Clinical Competence Examination (CCE) no later than the end of the fifth year after matriculation
  • Successful completion of a one year, full-time internship or its equivalent
  • Successful completion of the Clinical Research Project
  • Grade point average (GPA) of at least “B” (3.0 on a scale of 4.0)
  • Completion of these requirements within seven years of matriculation into the program
  • A completed Petition to Graduate submitted to campus administration

*Core courses are taken in the following distribution areas: Assessment, Bases, Individual Differences, Intervention, Methodology, and Professional Issues

Research Training

Consistent with our practitioner-scholar model and goals, this program can help you learn the knowledge and skills needed to critically evaluate professional literature, use this literature to inform your professional practice, and engage in research that aligns with your career objectives. Across the curriculum, your studies will be informed by current empirical research, and you will be taught to critically evaluate the literature and assess outcomes in a manner consistent with the model of the local clinical scientist. Formal training in research methods and statistical analysis occurs in two required semester-long courses, and, with this knowledge and experience, you may then begin work on your Clinical Research Project (CRP).

The Clinical Research Project (CRP)

The CRP is designed to develop and refine the skills necessary to integrate your clinical knowledge with research literature to produce original, scholarly research in clinical psychology. During this project, you will be expected to:

  • Significantly deepen your knowledge about a particular area (or areas) of clinical psychology
  • Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills
  • Develop and apply skills in research methodology

The CRP requires you to analyze and synthesize the psychological literature, to develop and investigate original research questions, and to draw conclusions based on the results of your study. CRPs may involve original empirical research using quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methodologies, or a comprehensive literature review with an original contribution, such as a proposal for program development, evaluation, or a novel treatment approach.

The Clinical Research Project can serve as a launching point for students and alumni to pursue further scholarship such as publications and presentations, often in collaboration with program faculty. Recent examples of such collaboration include:

  • Dr. Lisa Lilenfeld along with other faculty and students presented at a national conference: Edwards, T.M., Lilenfeld, L.R., & O’Sullivan, D. (2014, October). A cross-cultural examination of the influences of an afrocentric worldview on body dissatisfaction. Poster presented at the 20th Annual International Meeting of the Eating Disorders Research Society; San Diego, California.
  • Gruzska, S. N., Lilenfeld, L.R., & Riso, L.P. (2014, October). Are women with eating disorder pathology negatively impacted by a therapist’s body size?: An experimental analog study. Poster presented at the 20th Annual International Meeting of the Eating Disorders Research Society; San Diego, California.
  • Dr. Jessica Gurley along with other faculty and students had six posters presented at the 2014 American Psychological Association (APA) conference in Washington DC. Corum, M., & Gurley, J.R., (2014, August). Doctoral-level training in psychological assessments and internship director satisfaction. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC.
  • Gurley,J.R., Darby, J., & Corum, M. (2014, August). The EPPP is not the whole story: An examination of licensure rates among APA accredited clinical psychology programs. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC.
  • Luzzi, J., Butler, L., Gurley, J.R., Piechowski, L., & Lally, S. (2014, August). Assessment use and acceptability among forensic psychologists. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC.
  • Dr. George Stricker, faculty member, and two students presented at the 2014 APA conference in Washington DC. J. Wilson, K. Dunlop, & J. Sexton (2014, August). Electronic gaming and motivation (with) Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC.
  • Dr. Larry Riso collaborated with a student in a 2014 book: Riso, L.P., & Guzman, A. (2014). Treatment of adult depression. In L.R. Grossman & S. Walfish (Eds.), Translating Research into Practice: A Desk Reference for Practicing Mental Health Professionals, New York: Springer.
  • He also presented at APA 2014: Kindel, L.T. & Riso, L.P. (2014). Are schema modes important for relationship functioning in married and dating Couples: Implications for Schema Therapy with Couples. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association.
  • Dr. Lisa Piechowski combined with other faculty and students presented at the 2014 APA conference in Washington, DC. Piechowski, L.D., Corum, M., Gray, J., & Gurley, J. (2014, August). Identifying invalid presentations in civil forensic evaluations. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington, DC.
  • Gray, J., Piechowski, L.D., Corum, M., & Gurley, J. (2014, August). Test usage in forensic disability evaluations: an analysis of archival data. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington, DC.
  • Corum, M., Piechowski, L.D., Gray, J., & Gurley, J. (2014, August). Trends in the assessment of malingering in forensic disability evaluations. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington, DC.
  • She also had a number of publications: Gurley, J. R., Sheehan, B. L., Piechowski, L. D., & Gray, J. (2014). The admissibility of the R-PAS in court. Psychological Injury and Law, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12207-014-9182-2
  • Piechowski, L.D. (2014). Workplace disability. In K. Heilbrun, D. DeMatteo, S. Brooks-Holliday, & C. LaDuke (Eds.) Forensic Mental Health Assessment: A Casebook—Second Edition. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Dr. Steve Lally co-authored a book: Higuchi, S. A., & Lally, S. J. (eds.) (2014). Parenting coordination in post-separation disputes: A comprehensive guide for practitioners. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.