Arizona School of Professional Psychology

Arizona School of Professional Psychology

Now accepting applications for Fall 2017

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Our Clinical Psychology programs are designed to prepare practitioner-scholars whose scientific, theoretical and practical foundations enable them to meet the challenges of the diverse settings, populations and communities in which they serve.

Personal and Professional Preparation

The Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University (ASPP) is located in north Phoenix, minutes from the city’s public transportation, restaurants and cultural and entertainment venues. At ASPP, we encourage your personal and professional growth through faculty mentorship, engaging classroom discussions and experiential learning through clinical training in both our master’s and doctoral programs. As part of our commitment to diversity, we also strive to ensure that all students understand the complex factors that contribute to social and cultural identity in order to competently offer psychological services to all groups and individuals.

Argosy University, Phoenix

2233 West Dunlap Avenue,
Phoenix, Arizona 85021
Phone: 602-216-2600

Clinical Admissions Director

Michael Hohenstein
mhohenstein@argosy.edu
602-216-3137

Financial Aid

Susie Valloneat
svallone@argosy.edu
602-216-3132

Local Training Sites

Through supervised experiences working with a clinical population, you’ll have the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge, implement clinical techniques based on this knowledge, and develop the professional and personal attitudes important to the identity of a professional psychologist. You may pursue clinical training at a variety of sites, including:

  • State Psychiatric Facilities
  • Mental Health Clinics
  • VA Hospitals
  • Forensic Sites
  • Child and Adolescent Facilities
  • Private Practices

Recent News

Uses Blended Approach: Psychodynamic, Existential/experiential and Humanistic Therapy to Assist Patients
Uses Blended Approach: Psychodynamic, Existential/experiential and Humanistic Therapy to Assist Patients

Summer Schneider
2014, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Psychologist III at Arizona State Hospital

“[My] education prepared me for a career as a licensed clinical psychologist with coursework that included both emerging research and foundational classic texts, relevant clinical training experiences, faculty accessibility outside of scheduled classes and quality role modeling from expert educators.”

Uses Blended Approach: Psychodynamic, Existential/experiential and Humanistic Therapy to Assist Patients

Dr. Summer Schneider is a psychologist at Arizona State Hospital where she provides forensic programming services to patients. “My primary responsibilities include forensic evaluation and report writing, general psychological evaluation for diagnostic clarification, co-management of two forensic units, treatment planning, individual therapy, group therapy, supervision, consultation and training of direct care staff,” she says.

Schneider works with many populations at the hospital, an inpatient psychiatric facility. These include civilly committed men and women with serious mental illness, forensically committed men and women who have been adjudicated Guilty Except Insane (GEI) for the commission of a violent crime, pre-trial men and women in the Restoration to Competency (RTC) program and adult males committed to the Arizona Community Protection and Treatment Center (ACPTC) due to Sexually Violent Person (SVP) status.

Schneider earned a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology from Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University in 2014. “I quickly became aware of the limitations associated with my undergraduate degree. Working in proximity to various master’s and doctor level mental health professionals clarified my aspiration of becoming a licensed psychologist. I was especially drawn to their leadership and seemingly broad repertoire of competence in therapy, psychological evaluation, supervision and research,” she adds.

She chose Argosy University because of its well-respected program, training and education, small class sizes, caring faculty and proximity to family. Schneider is a first generation college student and did not have an educational “roadmap” to follow. She says, “it was difficult to turn down family gatherings in favor of endless studying. I am eternally grateful for my family’s patience and cheerleading along the way.”

Schneider’s education at Argosy University included comprehensive academic coursework including emerging research and foundational classic texts, relevant clinical training experiences, faculty accessibility outside of scheduled classes and quality role modeling from expert educators.

She earned a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology in 2012 and completed her “ultimate goal” of completing doctor level studies while training in community mental health, at the county jail and Arizona State Hospital. “This further informed my passion for instilling hope and providing care to underserved inpatient populations. Following an incredible internship, I was hired into the psychology department and completed an additional year of informal post-doctoral training [at Arizona State Hospital],” she adds.

While working at the hospital, Schneider strengthened her blended therapeutic approach in private practice. This approach includes psychodynamic, existential/experiential and humanistic therapy.

Schneider is an advocate for policy reform to improve protections for gender diverse patients and employees. “Consistent with these efforts, I am developing a mandatory training module to educate direct care staff about best practices for the treatment of patients who identify as transgender,” she states. Schneider was selected to pilot a psychologist-run unit at the hospital’s forensic campus, leading multidisciplinary treatment team in serving 15-20 forensic patients. “The role of treatment team leader has traditionally been reserved for psychiatric staff. Reimagining this role to include psychologists represents an important milestone in the evolution of the psychology department from consultative staff to fully integrated treatment team members,” she says.

She recommends that current students get a head start on studying for the Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology (EPPP). Schneider states, “the longer you wait to rip the tape off the box and begin studying, the harder your experience will likely be. There is a unique element to the EPPP which separates it from any other exam. You must meaningfully commit the information to memory and learn the artfully complex language of the EPPP. The questions are uniquely worded. Learn the language so you do not get lost in it.”

Schneider also works part-time as a private contractor conducting forensic evaluations for the Department of Child Safety (DCS) and providing disability evaluations for the Department of Economic Security (DES). She appreciates the meaningful relationships built at Argosy University. “The committee chair of my dissertation is one of my greatest mentors. I often reflect upon the magnitude of his positive influence [and am] grateful for his role in introducing me to my preferred therapeutic approach, his guidance in developing my observational skills, his ongoing friendship, wisdom and support,” she states.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Phoenix, 2233 West Dunlap Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85021. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/971 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University hosts continuing education workshops for supervisory psychologists
Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University hosts continuing education workshops for supervisory psychologists

The Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University (ASPP) hosted a continuing education workshop in March for approximately 70 professional psychologists who provide supervision to ASPP Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology practicum students from the Phoenix, Tucson, and Prescott areas. 

The continuing education workshops focused on:
•    Human trafficking with a presentation from a representative of the Arizona Attorney General’s office
•    Child abuse with a presentation by Dr. Maylin Griffiths, assistant professor of clinical psychology at ASPP
•    “Supervision in a Language Other than English: Ethical and Legal Obligations” by Drs. Louise Baca and Ana Luisa Bustamante, professors of clinical psychology at ASPP
•    Medical marijuana by Dr. Larry Sideman, professor of clinical psychology at ASPP,
•    “An Ethics Update:  Changes in AZ Law and Telepsychology” by Dr. Cindy Olvey, executive director of the Arizona State Board of Psychologist Examiners.

The workshops were offered at no cost to participants and as thanks for their time and dedication in supervising practicum students from ASPP.


 See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/971 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Phoenix’s Dr. Harrison Selected as Peer Reviewer for Scientific and Educational Journal of Therapeutic Riding
Phoenix’s Dr. Harrison Selected as Peer Reviewer for Scientific and Educational Journal of Therapeutic Riding

Dr. Sheryl Harrison, associate professor and clinical psychology faculty member at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, was recently selected to serve as a peer reviewer for The Scientific and Educational Journal of Therapeutic Riding, a publication of the Federation of Horses in Education and Therapy International.

Dr. Harrison joined the Clinical Psychology faculty at Argosy University in 2003. She earned her doctoral degree from Texas A&M University. She has provided consultation and worked in a range of clinical settings including adult psychiatric inpatient hospitals, a rural mental health clinic, a medical clinic, the Superior Court of Arizona, and Child Protective Services units. Prior to joining the faculty at Argosy University, she had a full time private practice for over 25 years. She continues to practice part-time.

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Graduate and faculty published in Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology
Graduate and faculty published in Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology

Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University 2015 graduate Amy White (Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology) and faculty members Dr. Gregory Schrader and Dr. Jared Chamberlain, published an article titled “Perceptions of law enforcement officers in seeking mental health treatment in a right-to-work state” in the Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, (31)2, 141-154

The abstract of the article states:

“The high stress environment of law enforcement places officers at risk for a variety of mental and physical health problems; however, officers are reluctant to seek out treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify which factors associated with law enforcement officers had predictive value in the level of stigma perceived in seeking mental health treatment by currently employed, certified peace officers in Arizona. The factors included sex, age, race/ethnicity, years employed as an officer, size of the department, current rank/position within the department, the type of government operating the agency, and payment of union dues. The study included 454 participants. Participation included the completion of demographic data, the Self-Stigma of Seeking Psychological Help (SSOSH), and the Perceptions of Stigmatization by Others for Seeking Help (PSOSH). Using standard multiple regression, the most significant finding was the relationship between the size of the department and levels of stigma (p =.014); such that, the size was inversely related to the levels of perceived stigma. As the agency size increased, the perceptions of stigma decreased. Such a finding has several implications for law enforcement agencies related to preparedness and training.”

 

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/971 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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