Doctor Of Psychology Curriculum

Following a practitioner-scholar model, our PsyD in Clinical Psychology is a 5- to 7-year program based on the competencies developed by the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology.

Our curriculum provides the foundation upon which you can build your clinical expertise, requiring you to be curious and introspective as you work with personal material through experiential exercises, assignments and role-plays. Rather than immersing you in a single theoretical perspective, we ask you to consider alternative perspectives, evaluate diverse theories and related assessment and intervention strategies, and apply multiple perspectives to clinical issues.

Throughout the program, you’ll be expected to integrate your clinical training with what you learn in your courses, with the Clinical Research Project as the culmination of your experiences.

Course Listing

Students enrolled in the PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | San Francisco Bay Area are required to satisfactorily complete 98 semester credit hours distributed as follows: professional issues requirements, 5 credit hours; intervention requirements, 24 credit hours; individual differences requirements, 9 credit hours; assessment requirements, 12 credit hours; methodology requirements, 9 credit hours; bases requirements, 12 credit hour; elective requirements, 6 credit hours; practicum requirements, 15 credit hours; clinical research project requirements, 6 credit hours; internship requirements, 0 credit hours. The curriculum should be completed in the order recommended by the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | San Francisco Bay Area.

Full Course Sequence

Professional Issues Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7100 - Professional Issues: Ethics, Conduct, and Law (3)
  • PP 7110 - Professionalization Group I (1)
  • PP 7111 - Professionalization Group II (1)
  • PP 7332 - Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting (0)**

Professional Issues Requirements—5 Credit Hours

Intervention Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7340 - Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations (3)
  • PP 7350 - Consultation and Supervision (3)
  • PP 7360 - Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)
  • PP 8010 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8020 - Person-Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8030 - Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8050 - Family and Couples Therapy (3)
  • PP 8650 - Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders (3)
  • PP 8670 - Human Sexuality (0)*

Intervention Requirements—24 Credit Hours

Individual Differences Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7010 - Lifespan Development (3)
  • PP 7300 - Psychopathology I (3)
  • PP 7301 - Psychopathology II (3)

Individual Differences Requirements—9 Credit Hours

Assessment Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7365 - Clinical Interviewing (3)
  • PP 7370 - Cognitive Assessment (3)
  • PP 7373 - Integrative Assessment (3)
  • PP 7385 - Personality Assessment (3)

Assessment Requirements—12 Credit Hours

Methodology Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7200 - Statistics and Research I (3)
  • PP 7201 - Statistics and Research II (3)
  • PP 7209 - Psychometrics (3)

Methodology Requirements—9 Credit Hours

Bases Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7000 - History and Systems (3)
  • PP 7040 - Cognition and Affective Processes (3)
  • PP 7050 - Physiological Psychology (3)
  • PP 7060 - Social Psychology (3)

Bases Requirements—12 Credit Hours

Elective Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • Elective (3)
  • Elective (3)

Elective Requirements—6 Credit Hours

Note: Courses that may be used to satisfy these elective requirements will be noted in the Registration Bulletin each semester under the title "electives".

Practicum Requirements

Practicum Requirements:

  • PP 8201 - Practicum I (3)
  • PP 8202 - Practicum II (3)
  • PP 8203 - Practicum III (3)
  • PP 8204 - Practicum IV (3)
  • PP 8310 - Advanced Practicum and Seminar I (1.5)
  • PP 8311 - Advanced Practicum and Seminar II (1.5)

Practicum Requirements—15 Credit Hours

Clinical Research Project Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 8499 - CRP Proposal Development (3)
  • PP 8501 - Clinical Research Project I (1)
  • PP 8502 - Clinical Research Project II (1)
  • PP 8503 - Clinical Research Project III (1)

Clinical Research Project Requirements—6 Credit Hours

Internship Requirements

Students are required to choose One of the following:*

  • PP 8900 - Internship (0) (for Fall, Spring and Summer)
  • PP 8901 - Half- Time Internship (0) (for Fall, Spring, and Summer I)

Internship Requirements —0 Credit Hours

Note: PP 8900 Internship is one year full-time. Students have the option to complete a two-year half time internship which involves a sixth year in the program. Students who choose to complete a two-year half-time internship enroll in PP 8901 Half- Time Internship.

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet the following requirements:

  • Successful completion of all coursework (98 semester credit hours) including:
    • 71 credit hours of required courses.
    • 6 credit hours of elective courses.
    • 15 credit hours (three years) of practicum and practicum seminar groups.
    • 3 credit hours of clinical research project.
  • Successful completion of the Clinical Competency Examination (CCE).
  • Successful completion of the Clinical Research Project (CRP).
  • Successful completion of the seven-hour PP 7332 Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting course (0 credit hours)*.
  • Successful completion of the fifteen hour PP 8670 Human Sexuality course (0 credit hours)**.
  • Successful completion of a one-year, full-time internship or two year half-time internship***.
  • Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least "B" (3.0 on a scale of 4.0), with no more than two grades lower than "B-".
  • Completion of these requirements within seven years of matriculation into the program.
  • A completed Petition to Graduate submitted to campus administration.

Notes:

* All PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program students must complete a seven-hour Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting (PP 7332) course.

** All PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program students must complete a fifteen-hour Human Sexuality course (PP 8670)

***Students who choose to complete a one year full-time internship enroll in PP 8900 for three consecutive semesters. Students who choose to complete a two year half time internship enroll in PP 8901 for six consecutive semesters that requires an additional year to complete the PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program.

Research Training

Consistent with our practitioner-scholar model and goals, this program can help you learn the knowledge and skills needed to critically evaluate professional literature, use this literature to inform your professional practice, and engage in research that aligns with your career objectives. Across the curriculum, your studies will be informed by current empirical research, and you will be taught to critically evaluate the literature and assess outcomes in a manner consistent with the model of the local clinical scientist.

The Clinical Research Project (CRP)

Formal training in research methods and statistical analysis occurs in the second year of the PsyD program, when you may begin work on your Clinical Research Project (CRP), with the goal of completing a CRP proposal by the fall of your third year. You will be expected to work on your CRP in your third and fourth year, or until it is complete. You will be strongly encouraged to complete a CRP prior to your internship in the fifth year, so that you have more time to focus on internship and advancing to postdoctoral training.

The CRP is designed to develop and refine the skills necessary to integrate your clinical knowledge with research literature to produce original, scholarly research in clinical psychology. During this project, you will be expected to:

  • Significantly deepen your knowledge about a particular area (or areas) of clinical psychology
  • Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills
  • Develop and apply skills in research methodology

The CRP requires you to analyze and synthesize the psychological literature, to develop and investigate original research questions, and to draw conclusions based on the results of your study. CRPs may involve original empirical research using quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methodologies, integrated literature reviews, or a comprehensive literature review with an original contribution, such as a proposal for program development, evaluation or a novel treatment approach.

The Clinical Research Project can serve as a launching point for students and alumni to pursue further scholarship such as publications and presentations, often in collaboration with program faculty. Below are some examples:

  • Greenberg, B., Walsh, B., & Carlos, M.C. (2016, March). Assessing the impact of sound sensitivity in tinnitus: Preliminary data from the Sound Sensitive Tinnitus Index (SSTI). Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Auditory Society in Scottsdale, AZ.
  • Greenfield, C. G., Lytle, P. & Hays, F. M. (2016). Living the divine divide: A phenomenological study of Mormon mothers who are career-professional women. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, 16, Special Edition, [Online].
  • Kadioglu, I. & Carlos, M.C. (2016, August). Exploring links between adult separation anxiety and attachment style in a Turkish sample. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.
  • Kaplan, A., Puliatti,R., Rohde-Brown, J., Khan, F. (January, 2017) Bringing diversity, inclusiveness, and social justice concerns to public awareness: Our experiences at NACIQI and beyond to create change and reclaim our core values. Presentation at the midwinter conference of the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology, Long Beach, California.
  • Langroudi, K., Walsh, B., & Valle, R. (2016, March). An existential-phenomenological investigation of being self-compassionate during the process of recovering from alcohol and/or substance abuse. Poster presented at the APA Division 32 Society for Humanistic Psychology Conference, San Francisco, CA.
  • Lytle, P. & Lopez, C. (2016, March). Women’s life choices… or lack of choices. Continuing Education session presented at Association for Women in Psychology 2016 Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Lytle, P., Aguilera, M. B., Ramirez, L., Rodriguez, N., Sales, M. L. A., Holloway-Ross, L., Wai, B. L. & Humphrey, A. P. (2016, January). Mentoring first-generation college/graduate students in professional schools of psychology. A poster session presented at the National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology (NCSPP) 2016 Midwinter Conference, Atlanta, GA.
  • Lytle, P., Pettit, H., & Carlos, M.C. (2017, January). My student or my client? Supporting the needs of students with mental disorders in clinical psychology programs. Poster presented at the midwinter conference of the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology, Long Beach, California.
  • Rice, J, Hobza, C, & Greenberg, B (2017, August). Exploring competencies of substance abuse training for treating Black American emerging adults. Poster presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention, Washington, DC.
  • Ross, C.N., Carlos, M.C., Hobza, C., & Lytle, P.F. (2016, August). Self-competency as a mediator between personal stress and school stress in graduate students. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.
  • Ross, C., Wong, J., Valle, R., & Carlos, M. (2017, February). Cognitive and academic performance in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Poster presentation at the Division of Rehabilitation (Division 22 of the American Psychological Association) and the American Board of Rehabilitation Psychology Rehabilitation Psychology Conference, Albuquerque, NM.
  • Sales, M.L., Komnick, L., & Lytle, P. (2017, August). Identifying compassion fatigue in military medical personnel. Poster presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention, Washington, DC.
  • Singh, R. & Valle, R. (2016, March). Homeless hearts: An exploration of the quality of life for homeless veterans. Poster presentation at the Institute of Violence, Abuse, & Trauma Training Summit, Honolulu, HI.
  • Williams, J. (2016, August). Helping students work through barriers to writing assessment results. In C. Hobza (Chair), The challenges faced as a first year supervisor. Symposium conducted at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.
  • Wooldrich, T., & Lytle, P. (2012). An overview of anorexia nervosa in males. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention, 20(5), 368-378.
  • Assouline, J., & Carlos, M.C. (2014, August). Clinicians’ perceptions of attachment-related difficulties in clients. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Hays, F. M., Lytle, P., Williamson, A., & Cimbora, D. M. (2012, August). Conflicts regarding religion and spirituality as manifesting in the classroom. In F.M. Hays (Chair): Training students for competency in religious and spiritual diversity–Lessons from the field. Symposium conducted at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Orlando, FL.
  • Langroudi, K. F., & Walsh, B. J. (2014, August). Compassion-focused group therapy with a forensic population. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Williams-Jackson, C., & Lytle, P. (August, 2014). Spectrum of identity: Cultural competence building in early childhood mental health. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Bagnell, N., Byndloss, F., Hobza, C., & Satre, H. (2013, July). Learning to effectively account for culture in psychological assessment: Case examples. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Barrow, K., & Williams, E. (2013, July). Confidence, curiosity, and rigor: Developmental shifts in the intern trainee. In Hays, F. M. (Chair), From practicum to postdoctoral fellowship: Training for competency in psychological assessment. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Carlos, M.C., & Jackson, B. (2013, July). Factors associated with dissertation completion among clinical psychology students. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • David, A., Hays, F.M., & Hobza, C. (2013, July). Examination of the Tower of London test with a visually impaired population: A preliminary review of the literature. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Dey, S., Persing, J., & Valle, R. (2013, July). Mindfulness, smartphone apps, and emotion regulation: A mixed methods study. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Hays, F. M. & David, A. (2013, July). Learning to apply material beyond the classroom: Balancing client, supervisor, and student needs. In Hays, F. M. (Chair), From practicum to postdoctoral fellowship: Training for competency in psychological assessment. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Jevons, C., & Valle, R. (2013, July). Giving voice to client suicide in clinical training programs: A transcultural phenomenon. Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Carlos, M.C., Perl, R., & Jackson, B. (2013, January). Utilizing relationships to enhance dissertation completion in professional psychology prorams. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of NCSPP, Nassau, Bahamas.
  • Herget, M., Persing, J., Popple, A., Ferraro, S., & Perl, R. (2012, January). The impact of one-way mirror training: ASPP San Francisco’s clinical intensive. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, New Orleans, LA.
  • Hobza, C., & Yang, C. (2013, March). Training for competency in psychological assessment: Perspectives from across the training years. In F.M. Hays (Chair), Learning to leave the nest: Looking at the supervision of a postdoctoral fellowship specializing in assessment from the perspective of the supervisor and supervisee. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality Assessment, San Diego, CA.