Master of Arts Curriculum

The MA in Clinical Psychology degree program at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University| San Francisco Bay Area is offered in a traditional format with courses in the mornings, afternoons, and evenings. This program can be completed in as little as 2 years and must be completed in 5 years.

Eligibility for Licensure

The MA in Clinical Psychology degree program curriculum's focus is preparation for the PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program and not for independent practice. The MA in Clinical Psychology degree program is not license-eligible in the state of California.

Course Listing

Students enrolled in the MA in Clinical Psychology degree program at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | San Francisco Bay Area are required to satisfactorily complete 51 semester credit hours distributed as follows: bases requirements, 12 credit hours; individual differences requirements, 9 credit hours; assessment requirements, 3 credit hours; intervention requirements, 15 credit hours, professional issues requirements, 5 credit hours; practicum requirements, 7 credit hours. The curriculum should be completed in the order recommended by the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University| San Francisco Bay Area.

Bases Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7000 - History and Systems (3)
  • PP 7050 - Physiological Psychology (3)
  • PP 7060 - Social Psychology (3)
  • PP 7200 - Statistics and Research I (3)

Bases Requirements —12 Credit Hours

Individual Differences Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7010 - Lifespan Development (3)
  • PP 7300 - Psychopathology I (3)
  • PP 7301 - Psychopathology II (3)

Individual Differences Requirements—9 Credit Hours

Assessment Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7365 - Clinical Interviewing (3)

Assessment Requirements —3 Credit Hours

Intervention Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7340 - Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations (3)
  • PP 7360 - Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)
  • PP 8010 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8020 - Person-Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8030 - Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3)
  • PP 8670 - Human Sexuality (0)*

Intervention Requirements—15 Credit Hours

Professional Issues Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7100 - Professional Issues: Ethics, Conduct, and Law (3)
  • PP 7110 - Professionalization Group I (1)
  • PP 7111 - Professionalization Group II (1)
  • PP 7332 - Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting (0)

Professional Issues Requirements—5 Credit Hours

Practicum and Practicum Seminar Requirements

Students are required to take the following:

  • PP 7355 - Intensive Clinical Observation (1)
  • PP 8150 - First- Year Practicum I (3)
  • PP 8150 - First -Year Practicum II (3)

Practicum and Practicum Seminar Requirements—7 Credit Hours

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet the following requirements:

  • 51 semester credit hours, which must be completed by the end of the fifth year of matriculation. The total credit hours must include:
    • 43 credit hours of core courses.
    • 6 credit hours (one year) of practicum which includes a weekly one-hour seminar.
    • 2 credit hours of Professionalization Group (PP7110 , PP7111 ).
  • A GPA of at least 3.25 on a scale of 4.0 with no more than two grades below "B-".
  • Successful completion of the Clinical Evaluation Conference (CEC).
  • A completed Petition to Graduate submitted to campus administration.
  • Completion of Child Abuse and Reporting (PP7332)

Research Training

Consistent with our practitioner-scholar model and goals, this program can help you learn the knowledge and skills needed to critically evaluate professional literature, use this literature to inform your professional practice, and engage in research that aligns with your career objectives. Across the curriculum, your studies will be informed by current empirical research, and you will be taught to critically evaluate the literature and assess outcomes in a manner consistent with the model of the local clinical scientist.

The Clinical Research Project (CRP)

Formal training in research methods and statistical analysis occurs in the second year of the PsyD program, when you may begin work on your Clinical Research Project (CRP), with the goal of completing a CRP proposal by the fall of your third year. You will be expected to work on your CRP in your third and fourth year, or until it is complete. You will be strongly encouraged to complete a CRP prior to your internship in the fifth year, so that you have more time to focus on internship and advancing to postdoctoral training.

The CRP is designed to develop and refine the skills necessary to integrate your clinical knowledge with research literature to produce original, scholarly research in clinical psychology. During this project, you will be expected to:

  • Significantly deepen your knowledge about a particular area (or areas) of clinical psychology
  • Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills
  • Develop and apply skills in research methodology

The CRP requires you to analyze and synthesize the psychological literature, to develop and investigate original research questions, and to draw conclusions based on the results of your study. CRPs may involve original empirical research using quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methodologies, integrated literature reviews, or a comprehensive literature review with an original contribution, such as a proposal for program development, evaluation or a novel treatment approach.

The Clinical Research Project can serve as a launching point for students and alumni to pursue further scholarship such as publications and presentations, often in collaboration with program faculty. Below are some exampes:

  • Wooldrich, T., & Lytle, P. (2012). An overview of anorexia nervosa in males. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention, 20(5), 368-378.
  • Assouline, J., & Carlos, M.C. (2014, August). Clinicians’ perceptions of attachment-related difficulties in clients. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Hays, F. M., Lytle, P., Williamson, A., & Cimbora, D. M. (2012, August). Conflicts regarding religion and spirituality as manifesting in the classroom. In F.M. Hays (Chair): Training students for competency in religious and spiritual diversity---Lessons from the field. Symposium conducted at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Orlando, FL.
  • Langroudi, K. F., & Walsh, B. J. (2014, August). Compassion-focused group therapy with a forensic population. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Williams-Jackson, C., & Lytle, P. (August, 2014). Spectrum of identity: Cultural competence building in early childhood mental health. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Bagnell, N., Byndloss, F., Hobza, C., & Satre, H. (2013, July). Learning to Effectively Account for Culture in Psychological Assessment: Case Examples. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Barrow, K., & Williams, E. (2013, July). Confidence, curiosity, and rigor: Developmental shifts in the intern trainee. In Hays, F. M. (Chair), From practicum to postdoctoral fellowship: Training for competency in psychological assessment. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Carlos, M.C., & Jackson, B. (2013, July). Factors associated with dissertation completion among clinical psychology students. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • David, A., Hays, F.M., & Hobza, C. (2013, July). Examination of the Tower of London test with a visually impaired population: A preliminary review of the literature. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Dey, S., Persing, J., & Valle, R. (2013, July). Mindfulness, smartphone apps, and emotion regulation: A mixed methods study. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Hays, F. M. & David, A. (2013, July). Learning to apply material beyond the classroom: Balancing client, supervisor, and student needs. In Hays, F. M. (Chair), From practicum to postdoctoral fellowship: Training for competency in psychological assessment. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Jevons, C., & Valle, R. (2013, July). Giving voice to client suicide in clinical training programs: A transcultural phenomenon. Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.
  • Carlos, M.C., Perl, R., & Jackson, B. (2013, January). Utilizing relationships to enhance dissertation completion in professional psychology prorams. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of NCSPP, Nassau, Bahamas.
  • Herget, M., Persing, J., Popple, A., Ferraro, S., & Perl, R. (2012, January). The impact of one-way mirror training: ASPP San Francisco’s clinical intensive. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, New Orleans, LA.
  • Hobza, C., & Yang, C. (2013, March). Training for competency in psychological assessment: Perspectives from across the training years. In F.M. Hays (Chair), Learning to leave the nest: Looking at the supervision of a postdoctoral fellowship specializing in assessment from the perspective of the supervisor and supervisee. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality Assessment, San Diego, CA.