Argosy University, Northern Virginia Campus

Argosy University, Northern Virginia

Located in the Rosslyn area of Arlington, Virginia, our campus is a short distance from downtown Washington DC.

1550 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 700
Arlington, VA 22209

Phone: 703-526-5800 | Toll Free: 866-703-2777


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Flexible Learning

Many programs have flexible learning formats-evening, weekend and online courses-so you can continue your education while keeping your current job.

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Our coursework is designed to develop valuable teamwork and interpersonal skills alongside academic learning for your career development.

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Argosy University provides an array of career services and advisors to help you reach your career and employment goals.

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Library Information

  • Overview

    The Argosy University, Northern Virginia Library provides a variety of printed resources to support campus curricula and encourage life-long learning. It maintains a specialized collection of books, scholarly journals, audiovisuals, reference materials, dissertations, theses, and more. There is also access to electronic full-text journals, books, and other content specific to our program offerings.

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Student resources

Our Student Services Department offers a variety of resources to help you during your time as a student at Argosy University. Contact us for more information about each of these services.

Tutoring

Tutors are available (at no charge) to provide ancillary support and help with select classes. Computer and software tutorials are also available 24/7 via the Campus Common.

Counseling

Available counseling services may include short-term counseling, consultation, and referral to community agencies. Local referral lists may also be available for counseling services we do not provide.

Health insurance

Optional health insurance is available to students through an outside agency. Students should contact our Student Services Department for information about obtaining this insurance.

Student activities

Argosy University offers a wide range of personal and professional opportunities designed to support educational programs and learning needs that are not available through courses or practicum. Offerings may include student government associations, lecture/workshop series, and special-interest groups.

Disability services

Argosy University provides accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. The Disability Services office assists qualified students with disabilities in acquiring reasonable and appropriate accommodations and in supporting equal access to services, programs and activities.

Students who seek reasonable accommodations should notify the Disabilities Services Coordinator in the Student Services Department of their specific limitations and, if known, their specific requested accommodations. Students will be asked to supply medical documentation of the need for accommodation. Classroom accommodations are not retroactive, but are effective only upon the student sharing approved accommodations with the instructor. Therefore, students are encouraged to request accommodations as early as feasible with the Disability Services Coordinator to allow for time to gather necessary documentation. If you have a concern or complaint in this regard, please contact the Disability Services Coordinator located in our Student Services Department. Complaints will be handled in accordance with the school’s Internal Grievance Procedure for Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment.

News & Events

Northern Virginia Instructor to Present at Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training in D.C.

7/19/2017

Northern Virginia Instructor to Present at Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training in D.C.

David Sacks, PsyD, associate professor and director of clinical training for clinical psychology programs at the American School of Professional Psychology, Argosy University, Northern Virginia will present at the Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training in Washington, D.C. The training is a 3 hour, hands-on workshop that prepares participants with skills to respond to a situation happening in a public space—specifically when a person being targeted for his or her nationality, sexual orientation or gender identity. It takes place from 9:30 am -12:30 pm on Wednesday August 2, 2017 at George Washington University.

Dr. Sacks is board certified in clinical psychology and is a delegate and member of the Clinical Training Committee of the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology. He’s also a member of American Psychological Association. Sacks practiced for 13 years as a clinician, supervisor and administrator in public mental health agencies in both New York City and Washington, D.C. and was Chief Psychologist in the Child and Youth Division of the D.C. Department of Mental Health.

Sacks is a graduate of Rutgers University’s Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology and the Program in Excellence in Municipal Management of The George Washington University.

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Argosy University, Northern Virginia OPEN HOUSE

7/7/2017

Argosy University, Northern Virginia OPEN HOUSE
Meet with campus faculty and staff to learn more about Argosy University, Northern Virginia

At Argosy University, our passion is teaching and learning. We develop professional competence, provide opportunity for
personal growth, and foster interpersonal effectiveness. Join us on August 5 to learn more about our upcoming Fall Semester and about our undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

Classes start August 31.
Saturday, August 5, 2017 | 10:00 AM
Argosy University, Northern Virginia
Refreshments will be served

ARGOSY UNIVERSITY, NORTHERN VIRGINIA
1550 Wilson Boulevard | Suite 700 | Arlington, VA 22209
703.526.5800 | 866.703.2777 | argosy.edu/locations/northern-virginia

For more information, contact Hanna Collins
Phone: 770.407.1014 | Email: jlcollins@argosy.edu

To request accommodations in connection with this event, contact the Student Affairs Department or program organizer in advance at 866.703.2777.

Argosy University | Northern Virginia is certified to operate in the Commonwealth of Virginia pursuant to Title 23, Chapter 21.1, §23-276.4 of the Code of Virginia by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (James Monroe Building, 101 North 14th St; Richmond, VA 23219; 804-225-2600; www.schev.edu).

Argosy University is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501, www.wscuc.org). Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Northern Virginia, 1550 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 700, Arlington, VA 22209 © 2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu. AU-051710

See auprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Performs Investigative Psychology Work for United States Army

6/22/2017

Performs Investigative Psychology Work for United States Army

Michelle Miller
2008 Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology
American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Northern Virginia*
Forensic Psychologist for the United States Army

“I am grateful for the pharmacology and neuropsychology classes, which ultimately prepared me for my internship and residency training at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

Performs Investigative Psychology Work for United States Army

Dr. Michelle Miller is a forensic psychologist for the United States Army. She’s responsible for investigative psychology work and is developing an agent wellness program. Miller’s psychology internship training program took place at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, followed by work as a brigade psychologist for 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division. “Following a year-long deployment to Iraq with my unit, I moved to Fort Rucker, Alabama and worked as the Chief, Survival, Evasion, Rescue and Escape (SERE) psychologist,” she said.

Miller earned a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology at American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Northern Virginia in 2008 and was assigned as the forensic psychologist for the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation Division.

Miller is an active member of the United States Army and a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal. She said that her deployment to Iraq was the highlight of her career. “I quickly learned to function independently as a psychologist in an austere environment,” she stated. “I also learned the importance of consultation within Army command channels. Lastly, I learned the importance of integrating into an infantry unit to gain the trust and respect of my fellow Soldiers.”

She added that her professor, Dr. Michael Lynch, encouraged her to pursue a position in the Army. “I am grateful for the pharmacology and neuropsychology classes, which ultimately prepared me for my internship and residency training at Walter Reed Army Medical Center,” she said.

Miller recommends that current students think outside of the box and look for novel solutions. “Seek to always test your limits so that you can learn, grow and become more resilient,” she stated. “Never cease in your attempts to improve the organization in which you work; there may resistance at first, but you can accomplish a lot with the right attitude and a proactive mindset.”

*At the time of Dr. Miller’s graduation, the school was called American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Washington D.C.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, Northern Virginia, 1550 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 700, Arlington, VA 22209. ©2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu

See ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/887 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Argosy University, Northern Virginia, 1550 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 700, Arlington, VA 22209 is certified to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (James Monroe Building, 101 North 14th Street, Richmond, VA 23219, 1.804.225.2600; www.schev.edu.

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For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12

6/8/2017

For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12

University of North Carolina (UNC) researchers led the most powerful genomic study of anorexia nervosa conducted to date to identify the common roots anorexia shares with psychiatric and metabolic traits.

A landmark study led by UNC School of Medicine researchers has identified the first genetic locus for anorexia nervosa and has revealed that there may also be metabolic underpinnings to this potentially deadly illness.

Dr. Lisa Lilenfeld, professor and faculty member at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Northern Virginia was one of the members of the Anorexia Nervosa Working Group of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium who co-authored this paper/project.

The study, which is the most powerful genetic study of anorexia nervosa conducted to date, included genome-wide analysis of DNA from 3,495 individuals with anorexia nervosa and 10,982 unaffected individuals.

If particular genetic variations are significantly more frequent in people with a disorder compared to unaffected people, the variations are said to be "associated" with the disorder. Associated genetic variations can serve as powerful pointers to regions of the human genome where disorder-causing problems reside, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute.

“We identified one genome-wide significant locus for anorexia nervosa on chromosome 12, in a region previously shown to be associated with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune disorders,” said lead investigator, Cynthia Bulik, PhD, FAED, founding director of the UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders and a professor at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

“We also calculated genetic correlations – the extent to which various traits and disorders are caused by the same genes," said Bulik. “Anorexia nervosa was significantly genetically correlated with neuroticism and schizophrenia, supporting the idea that anorexia is indeed a psychiatric illness.”

“But, unexpectedly, we also found strong genetic correlations with various metabolic features including body composition (BMI) and insulin-glucose metabolism. This finding encourages us to look more deeply at how metabolic factors increase the risk for anorexia nervosa,” Bulik said.

This study was conducted by the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium Eating Disorders Working Group – an international collaboration of researchers at multiple institutions worldwide.

“In the era of team science, we brought over 220 scientists and clinicians together to achieve this large sample size. Without this collaboration we would never have been able to discover that anorexia has both psychiatric and metabolic roots,” said Gerome Breen, PhD, of King’s College London.

“Working with large data sets allows us to make discoveries that would never be possible in smaller studies,” said Laramie Duncan, PhD, of Stanford University, who served as lead analyst on the project.

The researchers are continuing to increase sample sizes and see this as the beginning of genomic discovery in anorexia nervosa. Viewing anorexia nervosa as both a psychiatric and metabolic condition could ignite interest in developing or repurposing medications for its treatment where currently none exist.

Institutions that participated in this research include the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Karolinska Institutet; King’s College London; Stanford University; the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University; Massachusetts General Hospital; Charité-Universtätsmedizin Berlin; the department of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Duisburg, Essen; and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

Several international funding sources contributed to this work including, but not limited to the National Institute of Mental Health, the Wellcome Trust, the Price Foundation, the Klarman Family Foundation, and the United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research.

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