Newsroom

Argosy University Newsroom

Alumni Success

Brown Mackie College faculty member finds academic success at Argosy University

College life is filled with opportunities to build lasting relationships. As many discover, who you know is as important as what you know.

Rhonda Baughman credits her instructors and peers at Argosy University, Sarasota and Argosy University, Chicago as being significant to her success in college and her current career as a department chair of General Education at Brown Mackie College — North Canton.

“While my classes were instrumental in learning material, my instructors, peers, and colleagues were even more so in finishing the degree and putting it to good use,” says Rhonda, who earned an Education Specialist degree in Educational Leadership from Argosy University. “I now have an associate dean and dean who are positive, supportive role models and leaders who have prepared me as well as Argosy University has for the role of department chair.”

Studying online and on-campus prepared Rhonda for working in both environments in her current role. As a department chair, she manages classes and faculty members.

“At least half of my success as a department chair has come from the classes, knowledge, instructors, feedback, peers, and colleagues associated with Argosy University,” Rhonda says. “My company believed in me enough to help pay for the degree and I believed in me enough to take on the challenge. In the end, I think we both won.”

Her experience also includes work as an online instructor, faculty trainer, advisor for a student tutoring program, and freelance writer.

Rhonda is also active in her community; she’s been involved with the American Cancer Society Relay for Life, YWCA, United Way, Indian River Juvenile Correctional Facility (Massillon, Ohio), the Stark County (Ohio) Domestic Violence Project, and many other organizations.

Rhonda, who holds an undergraduate degree from Kent State University and a graduate degree from Antioch University McGregor, says putting in minimum effort and getting Cs were not enough for her. She advises students to put their best foot forward and give 110 percent.

“You have to want that degree and you have to want it more than anything you have ever wanted before and then go and get it,” she says.