Newsroom

Newsroom banner image

In The News

In The News Argosy University frequently makes headlines in many respected publications. View our most recent appearances in the news. https://www.argosy.edu/news-events/in-the-news

Filter Results By

San Francisco Bay Area’s Sarah Rush Featured in Newsweek Regarding Black History Month
San Francisco Bay Area’s Sarah Rush Featured in Newsweek Regarding Black History Month

Sarah O’Neal Rush, M.A. adjunct professor, College of Arts and Sciences at Argosy University, San Francisco Bay Area is a sought-after expert on the topic of empowering underserved urban youth and young adults to help them become strong, active members of their local communities. Rush, a mental health professional, is the great-grandchild of educator and activist Booker T. Washington.

Rush was recently featured in Newsweek magazine regarding Black History Month.
 
Professor Rush has written several books including her most autobiography, Rising Up From The Blood: A Legacy Reclaimed, which chronicles her family lineage. In the Newsweek article, she provided several recommended books to read in celebration of Black History Month.
 
Read the full article here:
 http://www.newsweek.com/black-history-book-recommendations-reading-list-553292
 


Read more...
Dr. Christy Hobza Discusses Whether It’s OK to Let Kids Know You’re Overwhelmed
Dr. Christy Hobza Discusses Whether It’s OK to Let Kids Know You’re Overwhelmed


 

Dr. Christy Hobza, assistant professor at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | San Francisco Bay Area, was recently quoted as a parenting mental health expert in PGEveryday.com (Procter & Gamble online platform). Dr. Hobza discussed whether it’s okay to let kids know when you’re feeling overwhelmed—and the best way to go about doing it.

 

“Kids are really perceptive,” explains Dr. Hobza within the article. “If you think your child does not know what is going on with you, you are likely wrong. Many kids pick up on the cue that if you don’t want to talk about it, it is not okay to ask about.”

 

She recommends adjusting your language and truly speaking to kids as kids—not as you would to an adult friend or partner. “Tell your kids that you are feeling (angry, embarrassed, sad, anxious), and use your child’s own experiences of feeling upset to help them understand what you are feeling.”

 

Read the article here: 

https://www.pgeveryday.com/family/parenting/article/is-it-ok-to-let-kids-know-youre-overwhelmed-what-the-experts-say

 

Read more...
Dr. Suprina Discusses Music Therapy to Help Beat Addiction
Dr. Suprina Discusses Music Therapy to Help Beat Addiction

Dr. Joffrey Suprina, dean of the College of Counseling, Psychology and Social Sciences at Argosy University was recently quoted in “Community Health” magazine. Dr. Suprina discussed ways in which music and music therapy could help a person to cope with an addiction.

 

“Music therapy can help [to] cure addictions across the board. But addicts should avoid music closely associated with past addictive behaviors. This can trigger addictive responses rather than help them process away from them,” he says within the article. “However, if they are motivated toward substance use to stifle emotions such as grief and loss, sad songs may help them [to] release those emotions and thereby diminish the drive toward addiction.”

 

Read the full article here: http://www.communityhealthmagazine.com/inspiration/survivor_stories/fighting-addiction-with-music-therapy/article_ce1d6c56-d1f6-11e6-b61f-bfda52867774.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=user-share

 

Read more...
Argosy University, Atlanta’s Dr. Williams Discusses Relationship with Technology
Argosy University, Atlanta’s Dr. Williams Discusses Relationship with Technology

Dr. Chinwe’ Williams, associate professor, College of Counseling, Psychology and Social Sciences, Argosy University, Atlanta was recently quoted in “The Network Journal.” Dr. Williams discussed the relationship that people have with technology.

 

“Technology holds an important place in our modern society. However, the amount of time we spend on technology is astonishing and can impact us socially and psychologically. While technology can provide a nice escape from life stressors (e.g., Netflix binges and Instagram surfing), our attachment to technology can also breed isolation,” he said.

 

To disconnect, Dr. Williams recommends “taking a hike” and “nurturing important relationships. There’s nothing like real face time, specifically sharing the same space and breathing the same air as another human being.”

 

Read the article here:  http://www.tnj.com/lifestyle/health-fitness/10-tips-to-boost-your-mental-health-and-wellness-2017  

 

Read more...