Do you display these 5 traits of good employees?) 5/9/2013 <p>No matter what your job description is, it makes sense to think about how you can increase the va http://www.argosy.edu/our-community/blog/5traitsofagoodemployee

Do you display these 5 traits of good employees?

No matter what your job description is, it makes sense to think about how you can increase the value you bring to your company.

That’s as true for those who are happy in their current positions as for those who will soon be looking for jobs elsewhere. Although it might not be possible to be a perfect employee, there’s no denying that some traits are seen as desirable to most employers. People with these traits appear to be hired more often, receive the best promotions and earn more than their counterparts.

Pay attention to the traits that count, and do what you can to improve in those areas. Here are five sought-after employee characteristics that anyone can improve upon.

1. Active

Active employees aren’t afraid to get the job done. They’re willing to risk failure and criticism in order to solve problems, and often, that’s exactly what they wind up receiving. However, in the quest for solutions, they also stumble onto methods and developments that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.

You can become an active employee by looking for ways to solve problems before you’re asked. You don’t need special skills to be the first person to offer to put your ordinary ones to work.

2. Detail-Oriented

Double-checking to make sure that you have your facts and methods right is an easy way to get a reputation for being reliable. Employers care whether they’re wasting time dealing with problems an employee could have easily prevented the first time around. When it comes to employees who repeatedly overlook details, employers are less enthusiastic in their recommendations and look elsewhere when new opportunities to advance come around.

Most workers get into the habit of assuming they’ve done things correctly. Do the opposite. Double-check your work assuming you might have made a mistake.

3. Confident

Employers like confidence because it’s a tell-tale sign of former success. It means you’ve learned to trust yourself through proving you can handle your responsibilities. Confident employees tackle their responsibilities without needing someone to hold their hands. It speaks to reliability, determination and work ethic--all qualities that bosses find invaluable.

There’s a distinct difference however between believing in your abilities and believing you are better than other people because of them. Arrogance holds you back at work, and doesn’t impress many people during interviews. 

4. Upbeat

Staying positive and being willing to work when you’re on the clock will make you an immediate resource. If you help the people around you feel motivated, they’ll enjoy being around you. If you’re dragging your feet and holding others back, they’ll hate having to rely on your help.

It can be very hard to turn a negative attitude around. Half of the work, however, is just keeping a smile on your face. Studies on facial feedback have proven that while we often smile because we feel happy, we can also feel happy because we smile.

5. Presentable

Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but a professional appearance is cut and dry. Your public speaking skills are not all that will be considered when you present to clients or your own company; looking put together in the boardroom makes a difference and is one of the easiest ways to improve your reputation.

Resources & More Information

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kensundheim/2013/04/02/15-traits-of-the-ideal-employee/
http://www.waspbarcode.com/buzz/characteristics-solid-employee/
http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/the-8-qualities-of-remarkable-employees.html 

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