Learning Shown to Protect the Aging Brain 6/6/2011 According to an article by university professor Wendy Croix, Ph.D., “How Learning Protects the Aging Brain,” the University of Toronto has done research which indicates that the education people receive as young adults and what they learn serves to protect their brains as they age, particulary their memory.The Toronto Study, which used brain scans during memory tests to evaluate cerebral activity, revealed that educated individuals have an easier time using their brain in comparison to aging individuals with less education. Researchers concluded that, “by contributing to flexible mental function, education protects memory.”While younger adults use the brain’s temporal lobes, older adults use the brain’s frontal lobes. Croix quoted Canada Research Chair in Neurocognitive Aging, Cheryl Grady, Ph.D., who commented, "the higher the education, the more likely the older adult is to recruit frontal regions, resulting in a better memory performance."To learn more about how learning improves memory, read Wendy Croix's article here. https://www.argosy.edu/our-community/blog/learning-shown-to-protect-the-aging-brain

Learning Shown to Protect the Aging Brain

According to an article by university professor Wendy Croix, Ph.D., “How Learning Protects the Aging Brain,” the University of Toronto has done research which indicates that the education people receive as young adults and what they learn serves to protect their brains as they age, particulary their memory.

The Toronto Study, which used brain scans during memory tests to evaluate cerebral activity, revealed that educated individuals have an easier time using their brain in comparison to aging individuals with less education. Researchers concluded that, “by contributing to flexible mental function, education protects memory.”

While younger adults use the brain’s temporal lobes, older adults use the brain’s frontal lobes. Croix quoted Canada Research Chair in Neurocognitive Aging, Cheryl Grady, Ph.D., who commented, "the higher the education, the more likely the older adult is to recruit frontal regions, resulting in a better memory performance."

To learn more about how learning improves memory, read Wendy Croix's article here.

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