Argosy University Blog

Make a Difference with a Career in Nursing—A Fast-Growing Profession

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Did you know that the nursing profession is growing at a rate much faster than average, according to the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics? Argosy University can prepare you for a career in nursing—and smart students know that this competitive profession is seeking nurses with not just an associate’s degree—a bachelor’s degree means advanced opportunities in the field.

So what can you do with a degree in nursing? Our population is aging, and medical advances as well as new technology requires training and knowledge. Argosy University’s RN to BSN degree completion program helps current nurses to gain the skills needed to move into higher level positions.

Our programs train nurses for work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare, and nursing homes. Our graduates are committed to making a difference through compassionate, educated, experienced care in all types of nursing jobs.

Because many nurses begin their careers with an associate’s degree, the program at Argosy University attracts experienced nurses ready to advance— nearly 62% of students are over the age of 40. The program may be taken part time and is offered in a blended online/in-school format.

The National Academy of Medicine has recommended the nursing profession increase the percentage of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020. Be a part of the growth by earning your Bachelor’s degree from Argosy University. Contact us today and get started!

This program is offered at the following Argosy University campuses: Northern Virginia, Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, Hawaii, and Twin Cities.

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Starting Your Career as a Dental Hygienist in Twin Cities

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You’ve seen them the dentist. They’re the trained professionals who make your teeth sparkly clean and give you tips on keeping them looking great until your next appointment. These dental hygienists are an integral part of a dentist’s office—building relationships with clients, performing preventative services and providing a vital health service.

Today’s dental hygienists know that oral health directly relates overall general health. And this knowledge is driving demand to fill open positions in this health care related field. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook shows that jobs in dental hygiene are growing at a rate “much faster than average,” with nearly 210,000 jobs opening up nationwide per year.

So what can you do with a degree in dental hygiene? Graduates of Argosy University, Twin Cities’ Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene program treat patients and sometimes choose to work as educators, researchers, administrators or business professionals.

To earn your degree, you’ll participate in hands-on clinical experience at an established dental clinic. You’ll have the opportunity to develop critical thinking, interpersonal and technical skills. And you’ll learn from faculty members who are experienced practitioners.

The program can be completed in as few as five semesters and students may join the Student American Dental Hygiene Association.

Ready to begin your path to becoming a dental hygienist? Learn more about Argosy University, Twin Cities’ program, the courses you’ll take, and what you can expect as a student by visiting the school’s webpage for the Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene .

The Dental Hygiene program at Argosy University, Twin Cities is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. Graduates of the program must successfully pass three exams prior to being issued a license* to practice dental hygiene: The American Dental Association (ADA) National Board Dental Hygiene Exam (NBDHE), the Central Regional Dental Testing Service (CRDTS) exam required by the practicing state, and the state jurisprudence exam for dental hygienists.


*Argosy University does not guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to Argosy University.


Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Argosy University, 1515 Central Parkway, Twin Cities, MN 55121 © 2018 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@argosy.edu.
See http://ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/873 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Rare Disease Awareness

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She was a beautiful child. She was so good-looking that her cuteness was almost a caricature. Her blonde hair fell straight onto her shoulders, with bangs that were cut to reveal her forehead, accentuating her big blue eyes. Her nose was small and turned up ever so slightly. She was petite, even for a seven-year-old. She looked me straight in the eye nearly continuously and was almost always smiling. Her mood was one of happiness and she was a joy to be around. If a cartoonist had set out to convey his conception of a living doll, this might have been the result. There were a lot of toys available in the room, but her attention was exclusively directed toward me. She seemed to be oblivious to the presence of her mother or the female doctoral student also in the room with us.

The child’s mother reported that her daughter loved music. With very little instruction the girl seemed to just intuitively know how to play the piano, her mother noted with some pride. The child had been a colicky infant, but she developed language remarkably well, and perhaps a little early, and she was now quite verbal. Despite some fine motor problems, the child was quite social in school, although mostly oriented toward the adults.

She continued to ignore the room full of toys and started climbing onto my lap. I have performed a great number of psychological assessments, but this is the only time that this happened. I must have looked startled.

“This is what happens,” her mother said. “She is overly friendly with strangers. She took a strange man’s hand in the mall and asked if she could go with him. Fortunately, I was right there.”

My student and I asked a few diagnostically important questions to evaluate some important hypotheses. There did not appear to be a history of abuse or exploitation, although the child was clearly at great risk. We could identify no other relevant psychological factors to explain the child’s profound impairment of social boundaries. We had no solution to this puzzle.

The mother revealed that she has been distressed by the child’s behavior for several years. The pediatrician thought that the child was mildly uncoordinated, but otherwise physically healthy. This family’s experience in the ambiguous world of rare disease had begun.

I had been involved in the broader issue of rare disease for many years through my association with the communities affected by Gaucher Disease and other lysosomal disorders. However, those experiences did not help me to understand this child. My rare disease experiences did tell me, though, that well-defined, enduring observations that appear to have little relationship with each other, may have a common cause.

Science, I learned many years ago, attempts to describe, explain, predict, modify, and control observed phenomena. And a good theory will explain the observations in the simplest manner. “A good theory is parsimonious,” I can still hear my professor saying. The answers are here, if we can only ask the right questions. And then we must separate the signal from the noise.


The Gaucher Disease experience, to use the example of the most common lysosomal disorder, required scientists to explain how a large spleen may be related to a painful leg, or how a nosebleed may be related to a flask-shaped long bone. All of those observations are united by a single explanatory theory: A diagnosis of Gaucher Disease. And in retrospect, when a diagnosis is confirmed, it is easy to wonder how it had ever been missed.

But the reality is that rare disorders are, well, really rare. The constellation of indicators is present, and evident to multiple observers. But the explanation is not handed to us. In a movie, the sets, costumes, props, dialogue, effects, and even the music are integrated to tell us a story. A scientist has a collection of observations, but no narrator to tell him where to look.

My young patient did not come to the clinic with a book about her life. Could there be a single theory to describe and explain my observations? I could not flip ahead to see how it all turns out. I would be helping to write her life’s story, and I am not ashamed to say that I too was distressed by the ambiguity. Families affected by rare disorders commonly wait almost five years until someone puts the pieces together. And a delay of decades is not uncommon.

Psychologists have some very good science-based methods of assessment, at least with regard to the most common issues affecting children and adolescents. Yet there was no single test or algorithm to put the observations together for us with this child. We still had observations that represented ill-fitted puzzle pieces. What does it mean for a good looking and happy child with a history of colic to have a friendly personality, exceptional musical ability, some impaired coordination, and an extraordinary absence of apprehension around strangers?

I derive a very special type of joy from seeing a student do our work better than me. And my almost-a-psychologist student developed the explanation that we call a theory or, as in this case, a diagnosis. As my student discovered, hidden within the pages of references on behavioral genetics, fewer than 1 in 10,000 people will have a certain deletion on chromosome 7. And such people are sometimes described as elfin, musical, and socially uninhibited.

There is a certain satisfaction, but also some distress in learning that the symptoms fit a known pattern. At a follow-up meeting, the mother cried when we told her that the constellation of her daughter’s characteristics matched Williams Syndrome, one of the rare genetic disorders.

According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders,

People with rare diseases have tremendous unmet needs, including misdiagnosis, a long time to finally receive a correct diagnosis, and when they do, 95% have no treatment with ZERO CURES (http://rarediseaseday.us/).

Research will help us to find the answers. And we have a lot of work yet to do.


Author Bio

Dr. Wayne Rosenfield worked for many years in Connecticut to develop and implement inpatient treatment programs for persons with chronic and debilitating mental disorders. His interest in addressing the most intense problems led him to disaster mental health deployments with the Red Cross following the 2001 terrorist attacks, and then to crisis work in hospital emergency departments. He was again with the Red Cross in Newtown the day after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Engaged with Connecticut’s response to Sandy Hook he was part of a statewide initiative to treat trauma in children. Having relocated to Florida, he is part of a research team examining a novel treatment for combat PTSD, and he performs psychological assessments for a group practice. He is a frequent speaker in the US and internationally on the subject of rare diseases. He is an adjunct instructor at Argosy University Sarasota , who teaches School Psychology in the College of Education . His highly rated book, Great Necessities, is available on Amazon.com.

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