Argosy University Blog

Earning an Advanced Degree in your 30s, 40s, or even 50s—Tales of a Non-Traditional Student


There are many reasons the people return to school after years in the workforce. They may be looking to move up in their career, want a change of direction, or want to show their own children that it’s possible to balance work, life, and continuing education.

Going back to school to earn an advanced degree was always in the back of Bahareh Sahebi’s mind. Sahebi is currently a student working toward a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology at Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University | Schaumburg. She had a genuine interest in psychology and even earned undergraduate degrees in sociology and psychology. But once she completed her four-year degrees, she entered the working world as a corporate business analyst and project manager.

After years in the business world, she decided to follow her passion for psychology. She went back to school as a non-traditional student and completed a master’s degree. Sahebi continued into Argosy University’s Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program.

As an older student, the transition was initially difficult—but she quickly found her place thanks to the school’s supportive faculty who helped her to re-adjust to academic life. “One of my biggest challenges throughout graduate school was to find my own place as a student transitioning from a non-traditional academic background and also changing careers,” she said. “One thing I appreciated about the program was the diversity in the student population’s age and previous career backgrounds.”

Sahebi added that she was grateful for faculty members who took the time to get to know her—and other non-traditional students in her class. “The instructors provided opportunities to help me bridge my skills from a previous career into competencies within the program that ultimately helped to enrich my overall experience as both a graduate student and a launching professional,” she said.

Today, Sahebi is working in a two-year residency program as a postdoctoral clinical scholar fellow at The Family Institute at Northwestern University. She works with individuals, families, and couples in a clinical setting. And she encourages others in her position to step outside of their comfort zones—whether it means pursuing a degree as a non-traditional college student or finding the courage to overcome a fear of public speaking. “Ask for feedback and take advantage of the many resources at Argosy University, including tutors to help you refine skills,” she mentioned.

Going back to school after a career in any industry can feel intimidating. But the support non-traditional students receive at Argosy University help them to transition back into the classroom and prepare for a new career. Learn how you can return to school to fulfill your career goals by contacting an admissions representative at Argosy University. You may also take an online classroom tour and see the many program options available in undergraduate, graduate, and doctorate programs.

See for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info .

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The College of Clinical Psychology at Argosy University Attends 125th APA Conference

The College of Clinical Psychology at Argosy University will be attending the 125th Annual APA (American Psychological Association) Convention August 3rd through 5th. We are in booth 501 through Saturday, August 5 at 5pm.

Celebrate APA's 125th anniversary by attending the annual convention in Washington, D.C., this weekend. Last-minute attendees can register for the convention in person at the convention center.

Come learn about The College of Clinical Psychology at Argosy University and our ten locations nationwide. Classes start soon! You can speak with clinical admissions advisors at our booth, too!

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) degree in Clinical Psychology program prepares individuals to provide therapeutic and assessment services to individuals, families, groups, and organizations. The Master of Arts (MA) degree provides a basic foundation in the principles of Clinical Psychology. Training in a variety of theoretical orientations and specialty areas are represented across 10 individualized programs. Common to these training programs is a large network of shared university resources, a common set of training principles, and legacy of over 30 years of professional school training.

Our programs are academically challenging while encouraging your development as a person and a professional. Our graduates are prepared to provide ethical and quality services in a variety of settings, and many of our alumni are engaged in work that has expanded the impact of psychology on the world.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Administrative office: Argosy University, 601 S. Lewis Street, Orange, CA 92868. © 2017 Argosy University. All rights reserved. Our email address is

See for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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How to Raise Kids with an Attitude of Gratitude during the Holidays


Are kids naturally greedy? Or is there something about the holidays that brings it out? How seriously should we as parents take this attitude?

The holiday season represents a special and unique time of the year for adults and children alike. For many adults, the holidays can bring about feelings of pressure and stress when too much focus is placed on the numerous tasks which must be accomplished in order to have a successful holiday. For these adults, a conscious shift in perspective that refuels an attitude of gratitude can help tremendously in bringing back the joyous feelings of the holidays. The same goes for our children. It is quite easy, as a child, to become encapsulated by the material nature of our holidays as depicted by the numerous presents under the tree, or the gift-based classroom celebrations occurring before the holiday break. The enjoyment experienced when receiving and opening a gift is a very reinforcing feeling for both adults and children. This feeling is natural. An attitude of gratitude is a higher-order emotion that is learned behavior. Teaching kids to be grateful is an important lesson that they will carry with them for the rest of their lives.

· What (if anything!) can parents do to prevent greediness popping up in kids around the holidays?

The most important thing parents can do to prevent ungrateful children around the holidays is to model appreciation and provide children with the opportunities to experience this emotion first hand. Provide children with opportunities to learn what it means to be thankful, thoughtful, and giving in ways that they will relate to such as taking toys and baked cookies to homeless shelters that house families. Another idea is to host family nights that center around themes of generosity by watching inspirational movies that teach gratitude (i.e. Pay It Forward, The Blind Side, The Ultimate Gift, Home Alone, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, etc.).

· If you've got a Veruca Salt on your hands who is asking for more, more, more, is it too late? What can you do to tamp down the gimme gimmes? How do you deal with an ungrateful child?

It is never too late to teach your children about gratitude. Tampering down the gimme gimmes requires helping children shift their perspectives to become more aware of what they have, possibly in relation to others less fortunate, or in relation to what it took to receive what they currently have. This requires us, as parents, to also be mindful of our response to the holiday season. When we start becoming overwhelmed with the hustle and bustle of to-do lists, we can remind ourselves of the same lessons we are teaching our children.

· What about kids who wait to show this ugly side until the gift opening has begun? Any tips for parents when their kids display jealousy over siblings' or friends' gifts?

This too, is not uncommon. The event of gift-opening can be the epitome of materialistic encapsulation for a child. Shifting that hyper-focus from materialism to gratitude can be done through gentle reminders of what was learned during recent gratitude events (such as family movie night, baking cookies for the homeless, taking toys to children, etc.), by talking about the history or story behind the holiday (such as “The Story of Christmas”), or teaching gift etiquette. One way to do this is to focus gift-opening on giving rather than on receiving and allow each gift-giver a moment to tell each gift-receiver how special he or she is and share gratitude for him or her prior to presenting a gift.

Written by Dr. Andria Hernandez

Dr. Andria Chatfield-Hernandez is the Director of Clinical Training for the College of Counseling, Psychology and Social Science at Argosy University Los Angeles, California.

Dr. Chatfield-Hernandez is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist with a Private Practice in Yorba Linda, California.

Feel free to contact her at or

The information and opinions expressed herein represent the independent opinions and ideas of Dr. Andria Chatfield-Hernandez and do not represent the opinions and ideas of Argosy University.

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  • 2018

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